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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a friend who is a Qi Gong healer. He eats according to chinese medicine. He grew up in Ecquador (sp?), so he's actually very sympathetic to NT. He ate plenty of animal fats, raw milk, etc. growing up. But I always thought it was weird that he ate white bread, white pasta, etc. and not whole grains. I always thought that the reason was because of his wife, who is not adverse to processed junk. But I found out today that he deliberately avoids whole grains because of the gluten, which is more of an issue in whole grain. I didn't get the full story. But could there be a good reason why so many cultures refine grains before eating them?<br><br>
Soaking is a separate issue. If I eat bread, I eat sprouted multi-grain. I'm also trying to limit grains period. What are your thoughts?
 

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I don't think white flour has any less gluten than the whole grain it came from. They remove the bran and germ, but I think most, if not all, of the gluten is contained in the "white" part. I'm sure some of the gluten-free folks here know for sure, but I've never heard of refined wheat flour having any less gluten than wholegrain.
 

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Nope, white flour has tons of gluten in it. If it didn't then white breads wouldn't rise at all! Your friend would be better off eating whole grains that are naturaly low in gluten rather than eating refined wheat products.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It's possible he's just mistaken. He also eats conventional meats and produce. They say it's because they are broke. But I don't think he's committed to eating the right foods like I am. But I did hear that Fuhrman talked about this as well in a recent talk, that the whole grain has more gluten or is somehow more allergenic (which is an issue with gluten, right?). I don't know the science, so I guess I have to rely on other people's knowledge about this.
 

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erm... I believe white flour has more gluten, because the gluten is contained in the endosperm. When you remove the bran and germ, you concentrate the endosperm in the flour, thereby concentrating the gluten as well. That's why they frequently supplement the gluten in whole grain baked goods. That supplementation is why Rudy's Organic whole wheat breads are so much softer and have a white-bread like crumb compared to regular whole wheat breads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for your replies. There goes that theory. I was trying to look at Dr. Furhman's website for more info, but it must have been a passing remark at his talk. I'll stick with soaked/sprouted whole grains. Wasn't seriously going to replace them with white (most of the time <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"> ).
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">But could there be a good reason why so many cultures refine grains before eating them?</td>
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Okay, I know this is sort of tangential to the conversation here, but I think it's a little related too. Mommay, I seem to recall that you are also Korean too <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"> so maybe this will interest you.<br><br>
Anyway, I was having a conversation with my mom about all this WAPF stuff, <a href="http://www.westonaprice.org/traditional_diets/korean_beef.html" target="_blank">this article on traditional Korean cuisine</a>, and I asked her about the way Koreans traditionally prepared grains, particularly brown rice. She said Koreans traditionally ate white rice. They have eaten white rice since the Yi or Chosun dynasty (1392-1910). She said brown rice became a trend among some folks in the 1970s, but there wasn't really a traditional method for cooking it, since it no one really ever ate the stuff. (She does it eat, BTW, just about everyday).<br><br>
She was also confused by the suggestion that it was traditional for Koreans to soak rice overnight and then steam for hours. Maybe for some preparations, but everyday white rice was soaked for like, half an hour and then cooked until just done. Now my mom has had a lifelong interest in food science and Korean traditional cuisine and also teaches Korean culture and language, so when it comes to her food history, I tend to trust her.<br><br>
And then there was the stuff about beef...<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rolleyes"><br><br>
I looked up white rice at nutritiondata.com, and it has a decent amount of iron (although probably not well absorbed) and B vitamins. Rice is really just a little carrier anyway. Usually, you get this little bowl, and then a million other yummy things. From what I understand, the issues with refined grains is that it's mostly empty calories and can mess with your glycemic load. Maybe you can get away with a little refined grain, if the rest of your diet is making up for it. I soak a lot of things, but I'm okay with using white rice for sushi, having the occasional pasta dish, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That's interesting stuff Kelly. Yes, I am Korean and I did read that article on the WAP website. I found it interesting to get an NT perspective on the foods I grew up eating. My family was pretty poor in Korea, so I actually remember eating more pork than beef if we had meat at all. But the article does say that beef was often eaten by the affluent. They point out that we eat a variety of raw and cooked veggies. I think "ban-chan" is the key to the healthfulness of the korean diet. My 3 yo even eats "myul-chi" right out of the bag. A little bit of everything is very paleolithic, right? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
I also always wondered why rice was ever refined in the first place. Isn't it MORE work to take the rice apart rather than to leave it in tact? They refine rice in factories, I believe. So I always wondered about the logic behind that and the fact that refined grains seem to be a cross-cultural phenomenon. Perhaps it's just aesthetic.<br><br>
Now that's a pretty wide period of time. Is that right, 1392-1910? Do you mean refinement began at some point during this time, or that it began in 1392? Just wondering. If it began closer to 1910, I'd make a case that brown rice was more traditional.<br><br>
There was a thread here that actually supported the idea that rice did not require a long soaking time. That maybe it did not require it at all. I think I started it? Unlike my mom, I started soaking rice overnight, and it just didn't taste right to me. It tasted "moldy", so I wondered what other people did. Turns out Fallon says it doesn't really need soaking or not for long anyway.<br><br>
I think that's cool that your mom is so aware of her history. Like most Koreans, my mom always talked about food and its nutritional benefit (when I went to Korea men, women, children alike were constantly talking about the health value of the foods they were eating), but it's been really interesting because she converted to seventh day adventist a few years ago. They are pretty good about their food science. She uses sea salt, eats whole grains, lots of veggies. They're vegetarian, but she's not. She always thought meat was necessary for health. But she can't seem to give up ramen. So we're weirdly on the same page about our diets though we come from very different perspectives. I'm in the process of "taking refuge" in the Buddhist tradition (the religion of my grandmother). The lineage does eat meat. But my NT stance really isn't about my religion. I think one half of NT'ers are like my mom, and the other half is "crunchy" like me.<br><br>
Sorry for babbbling.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Mommay</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6505435"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">But I did hear that Fuhrman talked about this as well in a recent talk, that the whole grain has more gluten or is somehow more allergenic (which is an issue with gluten, right?).</div>
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Actually, most folks allergic (IgE-mediated) to wheat are allergic to non-gluten proteins (prolamins, albumin, etc). A subset of folks severely allergic to wheat are reacting to a specific gluten protein (omega-5-gliadin).<br><br>
Folks with celiac disease react to the gluten proteins. It's an autoimmune reaction involving IgA and IgG antibodies.<br><br>
White bread certainly contains chockloads of gluten.
 
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