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We are on WIC and get free milk and cheese, etc.<br><br>
About 2-3 years ago, DS started to get excema. We had a great doctor (who was even in LLL) and she said to cut the cow's milk, excess sugar, and artificial dyes out of his diet. I did and it works both for him and my younger DD about 90% of the time. That has been great, and I can really tell if we go some place and he drinks a glass of cow's milk. They both still have cheese and yogurt with no problems. (The Dr. had said this was normal, because is was not straight milk.)<br><br>
Anyway, now we live in a different area and are on WIC. We have been getting soy milk on WIC, which I guess is a not allowed. So the nutritionist has been telling me that my DC (who she just met once) are *not* allergic to milk at all, but that they have lactose intolerence, and if I would just give them lactose-free milk they would not get excema. She also said that dyes are in *everything* and I could not be avoiding them like I said.<br><br>
I thought lactose intolerence was when you had stomach-issues after drinking milk. I did not think it was related to excema at all. Is it? I do not even think cow's milk is very healthy and prefer not to drink it. I just want to know why the dietician is telling me this. I have heard some scary stories about WIC before and know they do not always know what they are talking about! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Anyway, am I wrong about the lactose and excema being two different issues?
 

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According to our WIC here you can't even get the lactose free milk. You can only get Skim 1 or 2% and whole milk. The other stuff isn't covered.<br><br>
I think you are right. It's a protein in milk that causes the exzema.
 

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Ds is lactose intolerant. When he has products containing lactose he gets eczema so yes, she is partially right. It doesn't happen that way for every child that is lactose intolerant or has eczema but it does for my ds. I'm also on WIC and they give lactose free milk for ds but I had to provide a doctor's note.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>its_our_family</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I think you are right. It's a protein in milk that causes the exzema.</div>
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But wouldnt that same protein be in the cheese and yogurt? The OP childrens eat that wiith no problems. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/headscratch.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="headscratch">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>momto l&a</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">But wouldnt that same protein be in the cheese and yogurt? The OP childrens eat that wiith no problems. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/headscratch.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="headscratch"></div>
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My ds can tolerate small amounts of cheese and yogurt. I was confused because ds cannot have a bit of regular ice cream but can eat tons of yogurt with no problems. I looked around and found this:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Yogurt is safe because it comes predigested. In one of nature's small miracles, the bacteria in yogurt take over for the missing enzyme and digest much of the milk sugar for you.</td>
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<a href="http://www.healthcastle.com/herb_lact.shtml" target="_blank">http://www.healthcastle.com/herb_lact.shtml</a>
 

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I think this is the kind of thing where you just have to try it. I don't think it can be nailed down to EXACTLY which component of milk causes the problem because it's different for everyone.<br>
If the problem was anaphalactic shock, I wouldn't suggest trying it.<br>
But since it's excema, it might be worth a shot, IF you want them to have milk.<br>
If you don't want them to have milk, my suggestion is still the same. Have them "try" it and report about the excema it caused.<br><br>
If someone suggested I couldn't possibly avoid dyes, I would ask them, "Are you specifically insulting my intellegence, or are you always condescending?"<br><br>
Dyes must be labeled in the ingredient panel. If you are reading every package, you will be avoiding them.<br><br>
Is WIC a state administered program? I really think it must be because of all the different reports. Here we can get organic milk, for instance. I've specifically heard that be denied in other states.
 

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Thanks Trish <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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A friend of mine has a dd that is allergic to a milk protein. She goes into anaphylactic shock. She has to avoid whey, caseine, milk (obviously) and a couple other things.<br><br>
My ds2 is sensitive to milk...he is bfed right now...but I'm hoping it doesn't carry over when he is older...
 

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It sounds like a difference in word usage between WIC and your previous doctor and you. Since your children can both have some yogurt and cheese, it is probably not an allergy in the traditional use of the word but a sensitivity to cow milk products. When we did a challenge diet to find out sensitivities, our naturopath shared the same info that your previous physician did: that the sensitivity may be coming from a slightly different biochemical situation with each type of cow milk/soy/corn/whatever product. We had to challenge each type separately. I believe WIC is federally funded but state administered, so I'm sure there are differences in what each state chooses to offer its participants depending on budget size and number of enrollees. Regardless, if you children get eczema after drinking cow's milk, don't expose them to it. It elevates their immune system response which can lead to more sensitivities and then allergies down the road. (My partner's two sisters have developed severe allergies in their late twenties/early thirties very likely due to undiagnosed early sensitivities to foods.) As for the WIC dietician's comment re: dyes, that's a complete load of crap, especially if you provide them with whole foods and read labels on the processed foods that you do feed them. As a previous poster said, dyes must be included on ingredients labels and are a common allergen. It continues to astound me how little some "experts" know about food and common allergies/sensitivities to food...<br><br>
warmly,<br>
claudia
 

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I also agree that obviously food dyes are NOT in everything - I never eat them and I like to eat <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
If your child gets eczema from drinking milk - he is either allergic or sensitive or whatever word you want to call it - it MAKES HIM SICK! You've realized that but a lot of nutritionists seem really dense in this matter.<br><br>
However, WIC is majorly subsidized by the dairy industry - they basically give away the milk products to WIC - free advertising, creates a familiarity with the foods so that children will then grow up and buy those foods themselves, etc. If it was just about providing food for children, then they would allow soymilk - WIC doesn't give you the foods themselves but coupons for the foods and the supermarket I was in yesterday had lists of how much WIC "money" could be spent on each type. But the fact that it has to be spent on specific types of food, i.e. dairy products, tells you where the incentive lies.<br><br>
I had horrible eczema as a child and still get it as an adult if I eat dairy, which I don't as a vegan. I don't agree that lactose causes the eczema because it is simply a sugar that some people have trouble digesting - this would cause gut problems and not skin problems. I'd stay off the milk.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Faith</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">She also said that dyes are in *everything* and I could not be avoiding them like I said.</div>
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Damn those artifically dyed apples!<br><br>
(smart-ass mode)
 

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I have had very positive WIC experiences, but I have heard horror stories. They are used to people who have very little regard/knowledge of nutrition. I'm talking ppl who give Kool-aid or Coke to a 4 mo baby. I know the nutritionist I see asked how I got dd (25 mo) to eat such a variety and I told her -"I just offer it to her".<br><br>
My dd refuses to drink milk, so they offered us the lactose-free to try without blinking an eye.<br><br>
I don't know anything about excema, but she is WAY off on the dyes. I think the only dye my dd has had was when she pilfered a couple of my M & M's! I don't find them difficult to avoid at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Sorry it took me so long to get back. I am having some major dental work done and it is kind of derailing the rest of my life right now.<br><br>
Anyway, thank you for all the info! I understand it all a lot better now. I am 'this close' to just quitting WIC. It is nice, but just such a hassle.<br><br>
We live in WA, and I heard all about how we would get organic farmer's market fruit and veggies, etc, but we don't get anything like that in this county. Just tons of milk, juice and cheese, and me getting talked down to from some girl probably younger than I am with no DC of her own.<br><br>
I won't be giving DC any cow's milk since it does make them sick, and we can buy soy milk for them just as easily. It's not like it would be some huge benefit for my DC to get used to lactose-free cow's milk anyway, despite what WIC says. I think this girl is just trying to prove some point, but it's not worth my DC having to deal with excema over.<br><br>
Thanks again for all the info. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I am a breastfeeding counselor for WIC, and some of our "nutritionists" don't know jack about nutrition. I have answered so many of their questions at work, and I'm not a nutritionist. Also, it's completely possible that the lady you talked to is not really a registered dietician. Here, the "nutritionists" can have a degree in public health, nutrition, science... In another county in MD, all they have to have is a four year degree in something.
 

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I just wanted to point out that it is EXTREAMLY rare (so rare some doctors think it doesn't actually exist) for a baby to be lactose intolerant. Generally people become lactose intollerant sometime between 2-7 (when they would biologically wean) going into adulthood. Bmilk actually has more lactose than cows milk (or formula). Most babies are actually having a problem w/milk protiens.<br><br>
Adults, meanwhile, are often lactose intollerant (since mammals are designed to drink milk after weaning). This has been taken to mean, by many people, that any milk problem is lactose intollerance, but it really isn't.<br><br>
Good luck!
 

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I just have to vent that it seriously aggravates me when "experts" especially HEALTH PROFESSIONALS do not stay current and informed in their field of supposed expertise. My work has a "wellness coordinator" whose background is in nutrition and she sends out these completely ridiculous weekly emails. With tips like, "Be sure to keep your egg consumption below two eggs per week--and skip the yolks!" Give me a break. The notion that eggs are terrible for you was discredited like ten years ago. It just gets on my nerves to be getting advice from someone who doesn't pay even a tiny bit of attention to what they're supposed to know about. Sounds to me like these WIC "nutritionists" are in the same camp.
 

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Your children do sound like they are lactose intolerant, not allergic to cow's milk. If you are truly allergic, it's a protien in the milk that sets it off, also in cheese, yogurt etc. If you are lactose intolerant, you can eat those things.<br><br>
However, I am lactose intolerant, meaning that the lactose sets off my stomach, and makes me feel lousy, and I break out in exema if I drink milk. That doesn't mean you want to feed them lots of cow's milk without lactose.<br><br><br>
So. Just tell the WIC nut. that you aren't feeding any cow's milk. Period. It's your choice. That worked for me. Ask to speak to the area superviser <i>everyone</i> has a boss!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Faith</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">We are on WIC and get free milk and cheese, etc.<br><br>
So the nutritionist has been telling me that my DC (who she just met once) are *not* allergic to milk at all, but that they have lactose intolerence, and if I would just give them lactose-free milk they would not get excema.</div>
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My two small ones are allergic to milk. Yes, it is an allergy, as someone mentioned, babies and small children are rarely lactose intolerant. I get so annoyed with a formula feeding friend at work who keeps insisting that it is lactose and not the proteins bothering my kids. I tell her not so since there is lactose in bm. She still thinks it is lactose, but whatever. But dd gets eczema bad when she has milk. She can have cheese a few times a week so I limit her to cheese and that is it, she loves cheese. Ds2 however, is allergic not only to dairy, but also soy, eggs and peanuts. His allergy to dairy is the worse one. For the first month after he was born we dealt with painful reflux until our systems cleared out.<br><br>
Not trying to freak you out, so please no flaming, but I think I read that they are finding that soy can stunt growth, maybe someone else knows if that is true. I was giving dd soy and threw itout as soon as I saw that. She was only having it here and there anyway, I pump milk for her when I can.<br><br>
I, too am appalled at the ignorance of some of those "experts" on nutrition. I know more than they do and it really is not a whole lot.<br><br>
Ginger
 

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Just wanted to mention alot people saying soy as an alternative-- alot of people that's cannot tolerate cow's milk have trouble with soy as well. Rice or almond milk are good alternatives.<br><br>
Mel
 
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