Mothering Forum banner
1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
856 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I can't stop thinking about this today.
I fully endorse nurse-ins- or anything i can do to even militantly raise awareness of the rigths of breastfeeding women..
Yet here we are mothers (most of us here) who by the simple and natural act of becoming pregnant are instantly potential victims of great and painful.. various traumas.

I think we as child bearing women should be protesting at hospitals with poor c-section rates. We all know there are ones that are worse than others. Now I wont argue that someone women *need* sections.. that is a given. But by far, most do not, and many more are being preformed than need be.. I also know i am peraching to the choir on this one. But I honeslty feel like there should be protests, there should be very vocal very public awareness shed on which hospitals are falling short when it comes to protecting our well being.

I am just throwing this out there at this point to see what others think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42,824 Posts
Well, I personally plan a life-long boycott of hospital birthing.


But yes, I agree. Do I expect to see it happen? Sadly, not a hope.

-Angela
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,413 Posts
ITA

What can be done though, other then raising awareness?

Gather a boat load of full term mamas and camp out in the hosp parking lot and give birth in tents-call the local and national news for coverage?

OMG, I think I just might do that for my next birth
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
856 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
well I am not a hospital birther either.. and maybe it is not do-able. BUt why can't women gather in a group and picket and protest a hospital with poor records?.. make press releases and the like?

The same with pressing charges after a rape.. i think the fact that our health and well being as women being disregarded affects us all really...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,160 Posts
I really like your idea of demanding better care. I live in a community that has a large alternative population--including a great number of direct entry midwives. Yet there is only one choice for birthing in a hospital for the area... and they are horrible (plus high section rate). Also the relationship between hospital and women who need transport from home births is also horrible... you get the picture... So I wonder why they don't improve things. I have talked to many people (because of my secret desire to be an activist) and they all basically said that the change has to come from the patients... that the hospital wouldn't put in place barriers for something women want (for instance epidurals). For instance many women I used to work with... they all told me "don't try to be a hero, just take the drugs." And, while I don't have any data to support this, I believe most women want the drugs. Now I'm talking about the women who are birthing at a hospital, not at home. And then there are other women who go without the drugs but still have all kinds of things done to their newborn, or other interventions or monitoring that perhaps isn't always "necessaryj."

I come from a pretty mainstream set of family/friends... and most of these women have a sincere trust in the hospital/birth center/doctors. I don't think the rates of csections are publicized, so any mainstream woman would potentially go into the hospital to give birth expecting that the doctor/nurses will do what's "best" for the woman/baby.

As cliche as it might sound, yes, women need to reclaim birth as their own thing... not what it has turned into. My disclaimer is that yes hospital do play a role in birth for some women... either by choice or by circumstances or by law. Some women feel comfortable birthing in a hospital, some women end up being transported to a hospital, and some women live where it's illegal to birth at home. Not to take anything away from the beauty of natural birth... yes I think there is a role that hospital births play in our culture and YES, women should be demanding better (smarter) care given to them and their babies. But the patients (women and families) have to be the ones who request it... so YES I think a ummm Birth In would be pretty great... or at least a protest of some kind would be great.

--sorry for the rant... my fingers get carried away when it's late at night.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,690 Posts
i really don't think enough women think there is a problem with birth the way it is. seriously, in my community i think you'd be lucky enough to get 12 people to show up. i hear women while i'm waiting to pick up my dd from ballet share how the doctor saved their life while they were birthing. hello? he saved 5 lives in this room where there are only 15 women. uh-huh. yep, it's that mentality that makes it hard to organize protests.

i'm not sure what it is about birth that it is not seen as a health issue for women.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,477 Posts
Honestly?
Because a sizeable number of people living in your country prefer to find ways of working around the system rather than recreating the system to fit their needs. History is on your side.
And you're never going to be able to find a court to rule that an unnecessary c-section was assault, so... your only real option for change is through the medicare system putting pressure on doctors to do less medicalised births because of the financial implications.
Or, of course, getting everyone to avoid the hospital network and birth at home with a midwife
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,133 Posts
Not too many ppl write the Board of Directors. I always start there first,as they are the ones who 'control' where the money is spent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,251 Posts
Sadly, I think the PPs are right in that not enough women are concerned with childbirth issues. And it's the birthing women who need to change, not the doctors. Well, obviously I definitely DO think that the doctors need to change, but they won't have any incentive to do so unless enough women educate themselves about childbirth to demand a change.

But I think protests would surely get the attention of women, if not the hospital. If someone were to ever organize one, I'd be in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,252 Posts
I guess a few years ago there was a movement called Project One Voice where they did do a protest at hospitals (just did a quick search and it was on Valentines day, 2004). It was to protest the rising c-section rate and VBAC bans. ALACE was involved.
Also, there is another organization called Take Birth Back (or take Back Birth, I can't remember) that has something planned for Labor Day. I believe they need volunteers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
940 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by mandib50
i really don't think enough women think there is a problem with birth the way it is. seriously, in my community i think you'd be lucky enough to get 12 people to show up. i hear women while i'm waiting to pick up my dd from ballet share how the doctor saved their life while they were birthing. hello? he saved 5 lives in this room where there are only 15 women. uh-huh. yep, it's that mentality that makes it hard to organize protests.

i'm not sure what it is about birth that it is not seen as a health issue for women.
I have to agree. And judging from most women I know, including myself, SO MANY people consider HB only after getting burned in the hospital. I had done all the research, and whenever the topic of a c-section came up, I always dismissed it with, "Well, my baby is already head-down, and I'm not having and painkillers and my blood pressure is excellent, so I don't even need to think about this." Never mind that all the red flags for their highly-interventionist routines didn't pop up until the very last few weeks, at which point I was in that highly vulnerable, nonconfrontational mode.

But when I first got pregnant? I thought MW-in-the-hospital was the perfect balance! All the reading material I had stressed the importance of "adequate prenatal care." I knew of one woman, via the internet, who was planning a UC, and I thought she was absolutely bonkers. And I'm the crunchiest person everyone around me knows.

I know that if I were to try and organize something to draw attention to our local hospital's 31% c/s rate, routine handout of "breastfeeding bags" and the OBs' bait-and-switch practice of selling moms like me on waterbirth and VBAC (in the same sentence, only to find out that VBAC moms are treated as super-high-risk), and worst of all the out-of-date practices of the pediatrician group that does the rotations, people would think I was crazy. Even when I talk to people one-on-one about my experiences, I really have to watch what I say.

I know ten moms (nine and myself) who've given birth in the last year, and two more who are due this fall. Out of the ten, six had cesareans (three scheduled for twins, PIH, and "big baby", three after failed pit inductions), one was a VBAC at the local hospital, two were pit inductions that ended in vaginal birth, and only one was a normal un-induced (though not unmedicated) vaginal birth. ALL of the c/s moms told me gleefully after their surgeries that at least they could have sex sooner, their babies' heads were so nice and round, and next time around they could just schedule their repeat cesareans. These are not people who are likely to protest the high rate of interventions; most of them think the interventions were necessary and lifesaving.

(And probably the saddest thing is, my local hospital is probably one of the "friendliest" hospitals around for moms. They were fairly non-pushy about a cesarean and "let" me go four days before bringing it up. They have the world's best lactation consultants. They do have the equipment and personnel in place for non-VBAC moms to have a waterbirth, and they do openly "allow" VBACs.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,105 Posts
I agree that most childbearing age women don't see any problems with the status quo. Therefore it will be difficult to change their minds if they are happy about how it is. Some maybe are less happy, but chose to bury their doubts or live in denial, since it is easier than making the effort to change.

I was a sheep, following the system. The hospital, midwives and docs know what is best for me, everything will be just fine.... Well, like many of you, the reason you are on this board is you got severely burnt by this system. Malpositioned baby, every medical intervention (except for actually recognising the situation and trying to help me disengage and turn the baby)... emergency cesarean - you know the drill.

We walk (or crawl or limp) away with our shock, trauma, PPD or PTSD.... That's why we are here. Weve come to educate ourselves - to find out why this happened, and to make sure it will never happen again.

But if our experience had been different - if we had had a little epidural and pushed out a babe 6 hours later and been generally pleased, or had a cesarean, but came away feeling the fabulous doc had saved our babys life... then we wouldn't be here right now. At least I wouldn't. I'd still be a sheep, preparing to go to the hospital again, probably for a planned cesarean. Sheeps tend to flock in groups, they are not going to stray for no reason.

Frankly, I am happy the internet is here. What would I have done without this support if I had had my child 15 years ago?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,125 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by AllisonR
I agree that most childbearing age women don't see any problems with the status quo. Therefore it will be difficult to change their minds if they are happy about how it is.
I think many don't realize that it *could* be better. They have a birth with epidural and all the interventions, and they think their birth went great. They're happy with it. They haven't read natural birth stories to know that there is something better. They've just seen births just like theirs portrayed on TV reality shows, and that's what they think is normal and a "good birth".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,010 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by jaidymama
For instance many women I used to work with... they all told me "don't try to be a hero, just take the drugs."
I heard this exact bs line from my mother. Its this kind of defeatist mentality that I believe the majority of people have regarding the power of the human body that makes this fight seemingly impossible. She along with others continue to make comments about "Well what are you going to do if you can't have drugs?" We are an addicted nation. The mainstream doesn't believe anything but taking pills will help you. I deal with family members who go to the doctor for every sniffle, take antibiotics for everything-sometimes multiple times per month, take muscle relaxers, pain killers, anti-depressants, and pop OTC meds the second they feel "something coming on" or a slight headache. ( One person in particular takes ALL of the above on a regular basis, and has been hospitalized twice in the past year for colitis and major stomach pain. ) How do you convince people that refuse to hear the other side and continue living extremely unhealthy lives, blindly taking their doctor's advice as Gospel? What really irks me is that these mainstream people have the ignorance to tell YOU how to live YOUR life, that what YOU are doing is dangerous/stupid/wrong, and that you're nuts for NOT wanting to take drugs. The insane are running the asylum, I'm afraid.
:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,048 Posts
Last year in Atlanta, at the busiest birthing hospital in the state, there was a large "protest" held about c/s rates...I knew quite a few mamas there. I think it even made a few local evening news reports
Think at one point, there was a dr. shouting across the parking lot
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,072 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by alegna
Well, I personally plan a life-long boycott of hospital birthing.


-Angela
me too!

alot of women are just ignorant and by that i mean, lack education. perhaps getting your community involved and holding meetings to educate women about the truth about sections/breasting vs. formula/etc. or hold a tabling event.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
856 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Almost every response included a comment that "mother's: do not see a problem.. but it is an established problem, an agreed medical act that there are too many c/s performed.. I guess that is my point really. If the mother's do not find fault with the care, than the hospital and staff are the issue. That is pretty well why i think it is almost a social/moral resposibility that those who do recognize a problem act on it.
Not to say protesting is the only method.. or that we are obligated to do anything, but rather that there are numbers who can see a problem here, and more vocal demandng of better care still might help educate more.

I like the idea of writing to the board too, I sat on the board for our local hospital for a while and I know at our hospital we took every thing patients said very seriously, but it is a small hospital with one OB/GYN who happens to be very anti-section.

If most mothers main-stream or otherwise blindly except the status quo.. and that status quo has dangerous and negative affects on all women..I personally see a problem there beyond just my avoiding the system. Even home birthing where I live is affected by the laws, the college of midwives as rules set by the community standard of care..which is set basically by the practices of doctors. Women really have no options here for true birthing options that are healthy that are also legal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,599 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by AllisonR
Frankly, I am happy the internet is here. What would I have done without this support if I had had my child 15 years ago?
I had mine 13 years ago. I sucked it up, and clung to my belief in VBAC like a drowning person clings to a lifeline. When it took me almost four years to conceive again, I almost went insane, and chased my own brain in circles, wondering if my c-section had damaged me. When I had three miscarriages, I spiralled into a several year long depression...and was completely convinced that my c-section had damaged me.

What I didn't know was that between my first and second babies, midwifery became legal here. Besides, I still trusted my doctors (family physicians)...they were totally VBAC supportive, and I didn't expect another breech. They hadn't been involved in the decision to cut me (my doctor came to the hospital in time for the delivery, but I was already under anesthetic at that point).

I'd never heard of ICAN. I knew sections happened - my mom had her first in 1963 (long before they became "routine curgery"). But, I had a flawless pregnancy...no morning sickness, no pain, no complications - nothing. A c-section just wasn't something that I was expecting, unless it was an actual emergency. I certainly wasn't expecting to be cut when I said no!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,110 Posts
i also plan to be a lifetime hospital birth boycotter!
i also do my part by being honest about my birth experiences in my own circle of friends. i agree- it is so ingrained in our society now that most women do not even think to question being treated so poorly when bearing children.
i am all for starting a bumper sticker campaign!!!
how would one do that?
i am thinking-
"birth is beautiful" to start....
our society definetly does not view it that way anymore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,403 Posts
Writing state legislators could also help. Especially in terms of changing insurance practices. A number of doctors would be happy to do VBACs and cut down on C-sections generally if their malpractice insurance would permit it. If states required malpractice insurers to insure safe practices such as those, it would be a step in the right direction.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top