Mothering Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
677 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<p>My son was intolerant of dairy in my breastmilk.  Horrible, horrible rash.  After weaning (30 months), we attempted to introduce every few months, always with different bad reactions - either a rash, or a tummyache, or most recently, his behaviour.  For the past year and more, any time he ate even a hint of dairy (say, a dairy-free muffin cooked in a buttered muffin tin), we would experience four days of violent, aggressive, frightening behaviour.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>He is now 4.5 yrs old.  In October, we tried raw milk.  No reaction.  In fact, he seemed to be even sweeter than normal.  We were amazed.  He had outgrown it!  So he ate more raw milk.  And then some local, organic (but pasteurized) cheese.  Still no reaction, at least not a big one.  Then we tried bad cheese (carry-out pizza).  And his reaction was worse than before, the rage was just so painful to watch (and to feel).  So he went off all dairy again.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>We've been taking him to a homeopathic doctor for his mood swings.  Some of the remedies were great, others were just horrible.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Last month I read somewhere about raw milk and enzymes and pasteurization killing them and ...</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I took him off all remedies and tried raw milk again.  It is, simply, the best medicine he could ever ingest.  My husband calls it Nice Medicine.  We've been on it for three weeks now, and our lives are just 300% better than they have been in probably a year and a half.  He just seems ... like himself.  Like himself in the best mood.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>So what I'd like to know is why this is happening.  I realize it has something to do with an enzyme in the milk.  Does this mean he was deficient somehow in this enzyme?  Or it's an enzyme his body cannot produce on its own?</p>
<p> </p>
<p>We're going on vacation soon, and I'm scheming how I can sneak a gallon of milk and a container of butter onto the plane ... I cannot imagine living without it now!</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
508 Posts
I don't know why it's helping him so much but as far as transporting it, I was once given the suggestion of passing it off as breast milk by freezing it in breast milk bags and carrying it on in a cooler. I didn't end up attempting it, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
904 Posts
<p>My DD also cannot tolerate pasteurized, homogenized milk but does fine with raw goat milk. It's true that pasteurization kills enzymes, but I think a bigger factor might be that the high heat of pasteurization denatures proteins in the milk, that is, it makes them into a different shape, which will affect how they interact with any other chemicals that they come in contact with. These denatured proteins will act differently in the body than the proteins in raw milk. I don't know the details of how this affects neurochemistry, and actually I'm not sure that anyone really does know, but I think it's a real phenomenon. I always kind of doubt myself on the whole food sensitivity thing, wondering if I'm making it up, but whenever DD eats any conventional dairy, it messes up her sleep. Clearly something in it affects her brain in a way that does not happen with the raw goat milk we get from our farmers.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
685 Posts
<p>I don't know if this will harm it but you can freeze it and check it in a cooler.  I have taken frozen food across the country with me when I travel.  I just bring a cooler that is taped shut.<br><br>
Raw milk is so much better because the human body is designed to digest cow's milk that is 24 hours old or less.<br><br>
My dad was a dairy farmer and growing up we drank milk that came right out of the tank.  When I was 13, my parents divorced and we were forced to buy store bought milk.  I developed the worst allergy to milk, got asthma, had horrible stomach pains every time I drank it.  It took me well over a year or so to out grow it. </p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
570 Posts
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;padding-top:0px;padding-right:0px;padding-bottom:0px;padding-left:0px;border-top-width:0px;border-right-width:0px;border-bottom-width:0px;border-left-width:0px;font-weight:bold;font-size:16px;font-family:'Comic Sans MS', cursive;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(128,0,0);line-height:19px;">‎</span><span style="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;padding-top:0px;padding-right:0px;padding-bottom:0px;padding-left:0px;border-top-width:0px;border-right-width:0px;border-bottom-width:0px;border-left-width:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">Not sure if this helps but here are some quotes form </span><span style="color:rgb(128,0,0);font-family:'Comic Sans MS', cursive;font-size:16px;font-weight:bold;line-height:19px;">"Make Your Own Dairy Products: Working with raw milk" by Nunley, Kathie F</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p><br style="color:rgb(128,0,0);font-family:'Comic Sans MS', cursive;font-size:16px;font-weight:bold;line-height:19px;"><span style="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;padding-top:0px;padding-right:0px;padding-bottom:0px;padding-left:0px;border-top-width:0px;border-right-width:0px;border-bottom-width:0px;border-left-width:0px;font-weight:bold;font-size:16px;font-family:'Comic Sans MS', cursive;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(128,0,0);line-height:19px;">"There are interesting <a class="FAAdLink" href="http://www.cafemom.com/group/116447/forums/read/16134751/Quotes_from_Make_Your_Own_Dairy_Products_Working_with_raw_milk_by_Nunley_Kathie_F#" id="user_FALINK_1_0_0" style="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;padding-top:0px;padding-right:0px;padding-bottom:1px;padding-left:0px;border-top-width:0px;border-right-width:0px;border-bottom-width:1px;border-left-width:0px;font-weight:normal;font-style:inherit;font-family:inherit;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(28,125,255);background-color:transparent;border-bottom-color:rgb(28,125,255);border-bottom-style:solid;display:inline;" target="_blank">studies</a> which you can find online showing how laboratories have tried</span><span class="text_exposed_show" style="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;padding-top:0px;padding-right:0px;padding-bottom:0px;padding-left:0px;border-top-width:0px;border-right-width:0px;border-bottom-width:0px;border-left-width:0px;font-weight:bold;font-size:16px;font-family:'Comic Sans MS', cursive;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(128,0,0);line-height:19px;"> to grow various types of bacteria including E coli in fresh grass-fed cows milk and they found that no other bacteria could survive more than a few minutes because the Lactobacillus was so strong and would overpower and kill the other bacteria."<br><br>
"However in the United States, during the 1900's, dairies discovered that it was more cost effective to feed their cows grain rather grass."<br><br>
"Unfortunately this change in the cow's diet also led to changes in the milk produced by the cows. The milk no longer had sufficient levels of the bacteria Lactobacillus to create the self-sterilizing environment. Now we had milk that was prone to being a host to harmful bacteria. People started getting sick.from the milk. Bacteria such as Listeria, E.coli, and salmonella were all found growing in milk. The solution of course was pasteurization."</span></p>
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top