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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i hope this is in the right place...<br><br>
i wanted to ask, why dont i want my ebf'd dd to have a sip of water, or to 'taste' a peach or lick some ice fruit bar????<br><br>
I dont want her too but whenever ppl ask me if it's ok i say no adn they ask 'why not?' --my reply is a lame 'i dont want her too'...<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rolleyes">:<br><br>
so, can someone tell me, what is the reasoning behind it..i guess i feel like why should she, she gets all she needs from me--<br>
but i mean does it reduce mymilk supply, will it get her 'used' to other things she may prefer over my milk or anything else that's more 'serious'??<br><br>
it's late. hope i'm making sense--i dont want her to have anything till at least 9 or 10 mos. or later...i want to explain this to dh in a way he;ll understand so he can 'stand up for me' too (for some reason so many ppl want to 'feed' my dd...ugh)<br><br><i>edited to add--dd is 13 weeks old..but ppl have been bugging me abt this since she was 2 weeks <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> also wanted to ask, wouldnt that mean she wont be 'considered' ebf'd? ugh, tonguetied</i>
 

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That's a really good question, and I'm sure there are good reasons (I want to hear them too, our son is due soon and I'm sure I'm going to have the same questions asked of me...), but the one idea that popped into my head was allergies... I know that the longer you wait to give your child say, peanuts, the better the chance they won't have an allergic reaction to it (I don't know where I got this info from, so if its not 100% accurate I appologize)...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
sweet!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"> even that *one* reason is good enough to get ppl (read:family) off my back --but i want more so keep 'em coming<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
thanks!
 

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One thing I remember learning in my mom-and-babe class, is that even small tastes of solid can *change the gut* and so thereafter absorption of the iron in your milk decreases and I think some other nutrients too)
 

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<a href="http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/solids/delay-solids.html" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/so...ay-solids.html</a>
 

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Here is anothrt link:<br><br><a href="http://www.allsands.com/Kids/Health/babysolidfoo_xrl_gn.htm" target="_blank">http://www.allsands.com/Kids/Health/...foo_xrl_gn.htm</a><br><br>
Print it and the kellymom ones off and hand them out to relatives! Or keep one in yr diaper bag and read to them from them.<br><br>
I let my 3 mo dd drink water from a cup at 3 mos, b/c she knew just what to do. I never let her have more than abt an oz a day. But latest research rec waiting on even water for 6 mos.<br><br><a href="http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/solids/baby-water.html" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/so...aby-water.html</a>
 

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Most doctors reccomend only breastmilk (or abm) for the first 4 months at least; if you have a family history of food allergies you should wait until about 6 months. The "Doctor said so" card works particularly well for older people.<br><br>
Some foods are more allergenic than others, and it's very easy to decline those (nuts, milk, eggs, shellfish, food dyes and "nightshade" fruits, to name a few) on the allergy argument. If you do a search for the Food Allergy Network, they can give you a huge list of foods that people can be allergic too. (There are tons!)<br><br>
You said your dd is 13 weeks old; is she sitting up by herself yet? There are other eating-readiness signs that babies exhibit when they are ready for solid food. I wanted to wait until ds was at least 9 months old because I have food allergies, but he did everything on the readiness checklists at 5.5 months. I gave him a bare turkey bone to gnaw on and he had the time of his life; the next day I tested his tounge-thrust reflex with rice cereal and ebm (mostly ebm, just enough cereal that I could pick it up with a spoon) and he swallowed it down, so I knew he was ready to eat. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Things to look for before a baby has solid foods:<br><br>
ability to turn his/her head at will (so you know when they're finished eating)<br><br>
sit well (preferably unassisted)<br><br>
reaches for food when he sees you eating<br><br>
can bring hand to mouth (sometimes they use their fingers to push food around in their mouths. messy, but cute!)<br><br>
is growing and gaining well (introducing solids too soon can severly damage a fragile digestive system).<br><br>
tounge thrust reflex has disappeared.<br><br>
My ds is eating (some) solids, but what gets me is that people always want to offer him crap. At the bank, a teller tried to give him a lollipop, and at a gas station, the clerk wanted to give him a cookie. He's only 10 months old, so I tell them "He's only got four teeth; I don't want them rotting before he's even got them all in!" It usually works, although someone did tell me "They're gonna fall out anyway, so who cares?" <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/splat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="splat"> If they're gonna offer, can't it at least be something healthy?
 

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Even tiny tastes of solids will make your dd's poop stinky! This argument is one of dh's favorite. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">
 

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saffiyya80, know what you mean. I get this too, especially the "just a sip of water". It annoys me. Just yesterday my MIL asked why I didn't give my 7 mo old dd, "a taste of your bread" - in a restaurant, it was toasted white bread loaded with butter! Told her I'll only be feeding wholegrains, wheat is a no-no this early on due to allergies and same goes for cow dairy products.... I really think she just likes to hear all my excuses.<br><br>
What I say is:<br>
- you can't guarantee the purity of the water or food - at least I know my milk is sterile and fresh. could be e-coli or whatever in the ice cubes in restaurants... and this IS important especially for young babies who don't have strong immune systems. It may be a small risk but why would I take even a small risk of making my baby sick? Especially since it is so unnecessary. I usually quote some recent article I read about food inspectors in restaurants and what they find... and as for people's houses - I saw a funny tv show once where they sent a food inspector into people's homes! even worse than restaurants...<br><br>
- mother's milk changes according to what the mother eats - so she's already getting a 'taste' of foods. formula is of uniform taste.<br><br>
- tell em when you do offer fruit & veges, you're only gonna offer organic. That should eliminate most food people want to offer.<br><br>
And gee, at 13 weeks, I'd just wanna slap those people. What they're really saying is they want the vicarious pleasure of watching baby try new foods while disregarding what's actually best for the baby in terms of nutrition and health. Selfish, ignorant people.
 

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i really like wombat's response <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">, lol<br><br>
oh the "altering the gut flora" article was written by an ibclc named marsha walker, it is called "just one bottle wont hurt- or will it?" if i remember correctly hth. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">
 

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I was planning on waiting until DS was at least 6 months, if not longer, to try anything other than breastmilk. But at 4.5 months he was watching, no engrossed in watching food go from my plate to my mouth. He even grabbed my hand after I ate something a few times. So I realized he was ready to try some food. I started out with rice cereal and he will now eat rice cereal, sweet potatoes, pea, pears, avacado, peaches and bannanas and yells at me until the next bite touches his lips. He is also still nursed and will be for as long as he wants to. I have not seen his interest in breastmilk, or my supply change since we started with some food. But yes, the poo sure does stink now.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><i>Originally posted by wombat</i><br><b>And gee, at 13 weeks, I'd just wanna slap those people. What they're really saying is they want the vicarious pleasure of watching baby try new foods while disregarding what's actually best for the baby in terms of nutrition and health. Selfish, ignorant people.</b></td>
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I totally agree! My sister fed my daughter rice cereal at 2 weeks because all her 6 children had rice cereal at 2 weeks. I told her that I wasn't going to offer solids until 6 months, but she kept harrassing me, claiming that I didn't think she knew anything even though she was an experienced mom. So I told her I'd think about it, just to keep the peace. I came down from a shower to find she had just finished giving her the cereal. I had left some ebm in the refrigerator, so she mixed it with that. Needless to say I wasn't too happy, with my sister or myself for not being more firm about it in the first place. My sister just really wanted to feed my daughter and it was like I was denying her they pleasure. She lives on the opposite coast, so she didn't know when she'd get to see my dd again. As it turned out, I went back to visit my family when my daughter was 6 months old, and I started to introduce some solids then. She didn't want any. Oh, and interestingly enough, she never ate baby cereal. I made it and tried it a few times, but she always rejected it, and I figured it wasn't the most nutritious thing anyway, so I stuck with fruits and vegetables.
 

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Since 1997 the American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended waiting about 6 months. Even longer than that, for about the last 12 years I believe, the World Health Organization has also also recommending waiting 6 months. EXCLUSIVE breastfeeding is best for baby's health until about 6 months. Some babies need to wait even longer. Sadly most North American peds. are not up to date with recent research. See <a href="http://www.kellymom.com" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com</a> and <a href="http://www.askdrsears.com" target="_blank">http://www.askdrsears.com</a><br><br>
If you give your baby anything but human milk before 4 months you increase the risk of asthma. Solid food before 6 months increases the risk of food allergies (which can result in ear infections, intestinal problems, rashes, etc.) and adult obesity.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Most doctors recomend only breastmilk (or abm) for the first 4 months at least; if you have a family history of food allergies you should wait until about 6 months.</td>
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I have read several articles that suggest babies from allergic families resist solid foods even longer. Some pediatricians (such as Sears' and Gordon's web sites) say it's fine if your baby refuses solids for 9 to even 12 months or more.<br><br>
Sears link above<br>
Gordon:<br><a href="http://www.drjaygordon.com" target="_blank">http://www.drjaygordon.com</a>
 

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To this--<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><i>Originally posted by eilonwy</i><br><b>Things to look for before a baby has solid foods:<br><br>
ability to turn his/her head at will (so you know when they're finished eating)<br><br>
sit well (preferably unassisted)<br><br>
reaches for food when he sees you eating<br><br>
can bring hand to mouth (sometimes they use their fingers to push food around in their mouths. messy, but cute!)<br><br>
is growing and gaining well (introducing solids too soon can severly damage a fragile digestive system).<br><br>
tounge thrust reflex has disappeared.<br></b></td>
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--it is important to add:<br><br><b>baby has ability to digest the table foods</b><br><br>
You will know this by looking at the diaper. Does the food look the same coming out as going in? Are the sweet potatoes still orange, for ex? Why feed it if all he is doing is passing it through? It actually costs him calories to do this "work."<br><br>
Then, is baby now constipated? Is he waking more frequently at night (from tummy pain)? These are signs of an immature gut that is not ready for table foods, even if baby thinks he is. He is young, and he does not know what is good for him. (This happens a lot with kids, :LOL)<br><br>
Next, beware of rashes, and other signs of allergy such as wheezing, goopy eyes and stuffy nose, etc. Almost all babies should not have solids until 6 months, but an allergic baby may need to wait til 9 mos, one year, or even longer. One friend of mine whose dds were highly allergic could only feed a very limited amt of foods at one yr, and they really didn't eat well until age 2 1/2. But breastmilk kept them healthy and well, of course, until then, and after!<br><br>
When you do start solids, go SLOW. Intro very gradually, to give the new digestive enzymes time to build up and mobilize.
 

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Well, Momtwice, we posted the same info together. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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"the introduction of solid food to the breastfed infant causes a major perturbation in the gut ecosystem, with a rapid rise in the number of enterobacteria and enterococci, followed by a progressive colonization by bacteroides, clostridia, and anaerobic streptococci (Stark & Lee, 1982) "<br><br>
from:<br><br><a href="http://www.health-e-learning.com/breasted_web_articles/JustOneBottle/supplementation_of_the_breastfed.htm" target="_blank">http://www.health-e-learning.com/bre..._breastfed.htm</a>"
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
thank u so much! u guys gave me tons of info to work with<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
i've told my parents some of it..my dad was 'singing' to my dd last week 'do u want water'(in arabic) over and over and over. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rolleyes">:<br><br>
finally i turned around said "NO, she does NOT want water so stop asking her'...<br><br>
told my mom about oral water intoxication,allergies etc..so it seems it will 'tide me over' for a while<br><br>
thanks again<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><i>Originally posted by DaryLLL</i><br><b><br>
Then, is baby now constipated? Is he waking more frequently at night (from tummy pain)? These are signs of an immature gut that is not ready for table foods, even if baby thinks he is. He is young, and he does not know what is good for him. (This happens a lot with kids, :LOL)</b></td>
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This is so very true....Kaeleb started solida at 5 months cause he was exihibiting all of the previously mentioned things (sitting, reaching, no thrusting reflex). Within 1 month of starting solids my baby boy was so constipated it was awful. I tried everything that my ped said..prunes and warm water, ect. Well, I am only able to supply about 1/3 of kaeleb's needs (am in relactation process and have been since he was 9 weeks old). He nurses for every nap and at night and about 5 oz of bm throught the day from pumping and hand expression and gets about 3-4 bottles of formula a day. My mother told me that I needed to stop breastfeeding him cause that was what was causing his constipation <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/confused.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Confused">:. I took him off solid foods (not sure when we will try again) and he is back to normal in that "delicate" area, can even see those beautiful bm poopies!
 

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I just have to say just because a baby 'reaches' for food doesnt mean he/she is ready to eat 'solids' (why anyone calls something you have to put in a blender solids is BEYOND me). Babies at 4-6 mos reach for anything and everything including food! I think it's more about a baby that is human wanting to be a part of the human social experience of dining but not actually wanting food for nutritional value. So far my research has come up with is this. As long as the baby was full term and or weighed more than 6.5 lbs at birth he/she is more likely to be just fine on breasmilk alone up to a year
 
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