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'Cause I did it...and I just read in a gardening book that you aren't supposed to. I'm guessing that it's got something to do w/cross pollination, but I'm a garden newbie and I want to <i>know</i> why!
 

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The reason, although I do not necessarily always agree, is that these are plants that are closely related and therefore they share similar disease and insect susceptibilities. So having them next to each other may increase the likelihood of such problems, along with the likelihood that they would be spread.<br><br>
Some gardeners actually recommend that you group plant families together, though, so that you can do a better rotation. In other words, you can have more years in between using a particular bed or area for that plant family if you do them all together. For me, for instance, I am always trying to find ways to grow a lot of potatoes, but they are related to peppers and tomatoes. I want them to have at least 3 years and preferably more between occupying the bed with any plants from that group. This makes it better to grow peppers and tomatoes together, in small quantities so that I can have more solanaceae-free areas and more available for them--especially potatoes-- the following year.<br><br>
It may be that separating them seems better if you look at a single year, but grouping can be useful if you are focused on your garden's health over five or ten years.<br><br>
Does that make some sense? I don't know if I was very clear. Anyhow, it is because those plants are related to each other and might share more problems, since many diseases and insects favor one plant family.
 

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If it makes you feel any better, I always put my peppers by my tomatoes. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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oops, I do it all the time <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/blush.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="blush">
 

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cucumbers, zuccini, gourds, pumpkins, and squash fruit are determined by the seeds growing inside them rather than just the mother plant, because they have separate male and female flowers. If you have cukes and zukes next to each other and they cross-pollinate, you might end up with yellow zuccini or green crookneck squash. Still tastes good, but probably not what you were wanting or expecting. Yes, it's happened to me and my green (yellow) straightneck squash was still tasty, but it was not quite right in my usual recipes. Try a google for cucurbits and cross-pollination for more info.<br><br>
other veggies, you don't want cross-pollinating if you save the seeds. If you're growing hybrids anyway, you probably don't want to save the seeds since you have no idea what might grow from them. Some plants don't grow as well when next to other particular plants. Your book should have had explanations for their advice!
 

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According to my "Carrots LOVE Tomatoes" it says that tomatoes are members of the "cabbage" family and all of this family will "repel each other" and should be kept apart...tomatoes also dislike potatoes and fennel. Tomatoes will protect asparagus against the a-beetle and gooseberries from bugs though.<br><br>
Good companions for tomatoes=chives, onions, parsley, marigolds, nasturtium and corrots, garlic, stinging nettle.<br><br>
dont' plant tomatoes near corn, since the tomato fruit worm and the corn earworm is the same thing.<br><br>
tomatoes love to be planted in teh same place year after year, this is ok unless you have disease problem, if you smoke don't smoke around your tomatoes and wash your hands well before handling them.<br><br>
PEPPERS= good-basil and okra are good companions<br><br>
doesn't say not to plant peppers and tomatoes (which i do) together nor about the squash and cucumbers, it does say to plant 3 radishes in each mound of cucumber and squash, don't pick, let it bloom and go to seed, the radishes help with bug control fthe the squash and cucumber. HUH, interesting. dang if i don't have any radish seeds.
 

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Well shoot, my corn is planted right next to the only open spot in my garden; a spot reserved for my tomato plants. Guess I'll just have to take my chances!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>reeseccup</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">if you smoke don't smoke around your tomatoes and wash your hands well before handling them.<br><br></div>
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and dont add plutonium or else you will grow Tomacco! and the cattle will go crazy!<br><br><br><br>
(simpsons episode!)
 
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