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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We raise our own animals. We harvest lamb, goat, and pork so I have that in my freezer. I make a killer pork stock.<br><br>
However, all of the NT books and essays talk about beef and poultry stock - not pork, etc. We rarely harvest beef and will harvest poultry for the first time this year. I haven't made lamb or chevon stock yet. Is there a reason that these three animals aren't mentioned in the literature?
 

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OK, it's not in The Book, but in the restaurants, we make pork and lamb stock all the time. And let's not confuse pork stock with ham stock, either! Ham stock makes the beans taste goood ... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/drool.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="drool"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Eat">:<br><br>
Rabbit stock, too! Yum.<br><br>
Of course, pork/lamb/rabbit/quail/duck/crab stock makes sauce, stew, soup, glace, gelee, consomme, or pot liquor to accompany said protein.<br><br>
What's tricky particularly with pork stock is choosing the right pork parts to make different consistencies of broths and stocks. Pig is gelatinous. Gotta skim pork stocks like crazy, too, or they wind up tasting muddy.<br><br>
Anyway, it's been done. Provincial French housewives do it all the time.<br><br>
I should add, that's not a particularly NT/TF answer, and I wish I could tell you why goat stock isn't strictly Traditional Foods, but I will tell you that, as a culinary traditionalist, I would consider it a sin against nature to have a whole goat or deer carcass and not use as many parts of it in as many different ways as you were able to do.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>ktbug</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10809947"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I should add, that's not a particularly NT/TF answer, and I wish I could tell you why goat stock isn't strictly Traditional Foods, but I will tell you that, as a culinary traditionalist, <b>I would consider it a sin against nature to have a whole goat or deer carcass and not use as many parts of it in as many different ways as you were able to do</b>.</div>
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AMEN!!!!! This seems like a totally TF answer to me!<br><br>
If this is helpful, I've made lamb stock before and it was great, used it in soup and for cooking rice.
 

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I'm sure goat stock is a totally traditional food. They just don't sell goat meat at most grocery stores, so NT probably just mentioned some of the more commonly-available meats/bones that people might want to make stock from. (And they purposely left out pork for reasons we're not entirely sure of - rumor has it that the co-author is Jewish and it was done out of respect for her.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>ktbug</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10809947"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I would consider it a sin against nature to have a whole goat or deer carcass and not use as many parts of it in as many different ways as you were able to do.</div>
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I completely agree.<br><br>
Fast answers, ladies. Thank you!<br><br>
Good to know this. I was curious about the strange quietness on "other" animals. Fergus Henderson's book briefly mentions pork stock but not lamb or goat. I'm glad to hear they make good stock.
 

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With lamb bones, I add lots of mint leaves to the stock. It is yummy!
 

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I couldn't find any reason not to make pork stock, either, so (knowing how delicious a bean soup made w/ a hambone is), I did it. I threw in a few star anise w/ the standard bay leaf & peppercorns (and of course, veggies), and oh my goodness! So good!!! Then I just waited for the right dish to use it in - can't remember what now - and it was such a nice addition!
 

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Just because something wans't mentioned in <span style="text-decoration:underline;">Nourishing Traditions</span> doesn't mean it's not a traditional food! There's only so much information that can be included in a single book, no matter how thorough the authors tried to be.
 

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I've made lamb stock. Why not? I use pork bones in soup, not stock per se. I've never had a whole pork carcass to deal with, otherwise I'd probably do it.<br><br>
I've never had a whole goat carcass, either, but the only time I've bought goat meat, it was cubed up from frozen, bones, meat and all. Whenever I bought it prepared in a restaurant (East <i>or</i> West Indian curry), it had obviously been prepared from that type of meat. You had to remove lots of little shards of bone as you were eating it. So it certainly didn't seem like they were throwing them out.<br><br>
This reminds me, my dad got an elk yesterday! I'm going down there with a big cooler Saturday! Woot!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Ruthla</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10815733"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Just because something wans't mentioned in <span style="text-decoration:underline;">Nourishing Traditions</span> doesn't mean it's not a traditional food! There's only so much information that can be included in a single book, no matter how thorough the authors tried to be.</div>
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Huh. I said "all of the NT books and essays". Not just Nourishing Traditions. All of the books I have that in any way deal with NT-type foods. I was most surprised that Fergus Henderson's book didn't mention it, which is why I asked. Thanks for your input.
 

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I'm guessing that since most people don't have easy access to goat meat, it doesn't get mentioned very often. I know I've been searching all over for it and people look at me as if I'm crazy when I ask if they sell it.<br><br>
I could have sworn that Nourishing Traditions mentioned lamb stock, but I might be mistaken.
 
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