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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I really want to get an accordion wooden drying rack like this <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FWooden-Clothes-Drying-Rack%2Fdp%2FB000E3FHGA%2Fref%3Dsr_1_8%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dhome-garden%26qid%3D1259733256%26sr%3D1-8" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/Wooden-Clothes...9733256&sr=1-8</a><br>
to hang my clothes on in this warm california weather.<br><br>
I figured this would be the best place to post because what is a better idea to cut costs that hanging your laundry. I prefer this style to a line simply because I can manuever it around the yard.<br><br>
I don't want to spend a lot of money, I also don't want something that is going to break if I put on pair of jeans on it. And where should I buy from?
 

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I've been eyeing up that exact rack. That particular one is sold through Greenfeet, a company I really like. I actually registered through them for my wedding so I have a fair amount of products from them and have never had a problem. The owner, Val, is pretty public and has a podcast More Hip Than Hippie.<br><br>
I have no idea about that particular rack though, or if you can find a better deal on it, sorry!
 

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I have a lighter weight version of that rack. Wet jeans would snap mine in two. I use it for little things.<br><br>
Just a heads-up about this type of rack: a strong wind can tip it over pretty easily. I'm sure even the heavier duty one like the one in the link would succumb, especially as the clothes dry and become lighter. Kinda sucks to have your clean clothes tip over onto the ground. Maybe you could figure out a way to stake it down if it's windy....?
 

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I got a similar one, though not as sturdy, from Bed, Bath and Beyond. I think it was this one <a href="http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/product.asp?order_num=-1&SKU=16424510&RN=1024" target="_blank">http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/prod...424510&RN=1024</a><br>
I've only used it for cloth diapers, so I can't say how it holds up to larger articles of clothing. It's pretty easy to find a 20% coupon in magazines, maybe even online, so you can get it for around $12.<br>
Best of luck finding something that works for you!
 

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IMO this one is better.<br><br><a href="http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/50095091" target="_blank">http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/50095091</a><br><br>
won't tip as easily. also fits more stuff.
 

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If you have a fence or can set posts, a retractable line might work better for you to hang heavy or large things.
 

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I just had a basic one like Nimbus mentioned while I was in college and it worked well. You can get them at probably any big box store (Target, Wal-mart, Kmart, Bed Bath and Beyond, etc). I was using it in a dorm room, so it had to be small and I only used it inside. The IKEA one looks really nice, especially if you are going to be using it outside.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>kathleen_mary</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14746320"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">IMO this one is better.<br><br><a href="http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/50095091" target="_blank">http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/50095091</a><br><br>
won't tip as easily. also fits more stuff.</div>
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I have a Leifheit one that is similar to this. It easily holds an entire load of clothes. I could probably get 2 full loads onto it. I also have one similar to the one the OP was looking at. I don't use it very often because it can't hold very many items.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>SeekingJoy</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14746393"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">If you have a fence or can set posts, a retractable line might work better for you to hang heavy or large things.</div>
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I totally agree with this.<br><br>
If you really can't do a retractable line, then an umbrella style one would be my next suggestion. Something like this:<br><br><a href="http://www.organize.com/dryinglinest.html" target="_blank">http://www.organize.com/dryinglinest.html</a>
 

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We have a similar one from Bed, Bath, & Beyond (purchased on sale with a 20% off coupon) - I dry everything on it since we're not allowed to have a clothesline in our apartment complex. It's served us well for two years with no problems! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I am in San Diego in an HOA with clothesline rules. The rule is the clothesline has to be below the fence line. We installed a retractable clothesline on the fence and stretch it across our backyard (not much bigger than a patio) to a metal hook in the shed door frame. I hang bedding items and jeans and rugs out here. I put wet pillows on our outside chairs since the slats and arms provide good airflow. I move the chairs around in order to catch the sun's whitening abilities. Part of our line gets sunshine and part doesn't, which is perfect. I put items susceptible to fading in the shaded part.<br><br>
I also have the basic wooden drying rack from a box store. I use it inside for all other laundry (clothing and some towels, but most towels just get hung back up on their rods). It holds enough for me because I dry clothes in the dryer for 20-30 minutes on "low" heat (non-clothing on "high"; bedding and rugs only get 5-10 minutes), and then I hang up clothing that goes on hangers and most towels back on their respective rods to finish drying. It is only the clothing that gets folded and put away that dries on the wooden rack. I use the dryer in order to remove wrinkles and to soften the clothes and to speed up the air-drying to daytime only. Our house is small and having a rack of drying clothing is a tripping hazard at night. (I place it purposely in high traffic areas for increased airflow to speed drying time.)
 

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I have 2 similar to the one in the OP from Fred Meyer. Each around $10-15. Probably not as sturdy but they work.<br><br>
I agree completely with the PP who mentioned it tipping though. I used mine mostly for drying cloth diapers but a breeze would knock it over and then they'd get grass, dirt etc on them <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked"> They worked better if I stood them on the deck near the rail where they couldn't fall as easily.<br><br>
I would much rather get one like this, but the price is pretty crazy.<br><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FWooden-Drying-Space-Saving-Foldaway%2Fdp%2FB0000TR5L8%2Fref%3Dpd_sim_dbs_k_1" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/Wooden-Drying-...pd_sim_dbs_k_1</a><br><br>
Or if you scroll down here to the bottom two.<br><a href="http://www.ecohousekeeping.com/clothesdryingracks.html" target="_blank">http://www.ecohousekeeping.com/clothesdryingracks.html</a>
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I can't really explain why I don't want a line. I just got a coupon in the mail just now for BB & B. So maybe it's a sign. And I have no idea where an IKEA even is. Probably for the best since I tend to overload when there.
 

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Maybe putting a couple sand bags at the feet of the drying rack on windy days will prevent tipping?<br><br>
Our wooden rack *can* hold one pair of wet jeans, but it takes *careful* attention to putting them on and taking them off. These wooden racks do not hold sheets or linens well. Unless you buy several and spread them out...
 

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My wooden rack is from Walmart and very similar to the OP's link. It's my 2nd rack in 9 years and the 1st was broken due to children playing inside it<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I hang jeans on it all the time with no problems and used to hang entire loads of laundry, folded over so it would all fit, so it can definitely take alot of weight (I aimed a fan at it or placed it in front of a heating unit and rotated the clothes around alot... I didn't have a dryer at the time and had to make it work!). I wouldn't use it outside though, unless I HAD to, cause laundry could blow off in the wind or, as mentioned, the whole thing could tip over.<br><br>
If I remember correctly, Walmart had a smaller flimsier one and another that was bigger and sturdier. I have the sturdier one. But at this point I can't give you any more details, such as whether it's the Walmart brand or not. It's about 4 years old.
 

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<a href="http://www.vermontcountrystore.com/browse/Home/For-The-Home/Right-To-Dry/Dryers/Wooden-Drying-Racks/D/30100/P/1:100:1030:10351:101201/I/f54181?evar3=BROWSE" target="_blank">http://www.vermontcountrystore.com/b...1?evar3=BROWSE</a><br><br>
I got mine at Vermont Country Store. I dry heavy sweaters on it. It never occurred to me to dry jeans on it. So humid here in the midwest, it would take forever. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="innocent"><br><br>
These would probably tip though outside if there was much wind action going on.
 

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wooden racks have their ups and downs - i have had them leave brown marks on white clothes. They also tend to mold over time, even in a drier climate.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I also have the basic wooden drying rack from a box store. I use it inside for all other laundry (clothing and some towels, but most towels just get hung back up on their rods). It holds enough for me because I dry clothes in the dryer for 20-30 minutes on "low" heat (non-clothing on "high"; bedding and rugs only get 5-10 minutes), and then I hang up clothing that goes on hangers and most towels back on their respective rods to finish drying. It is only the clothing that gets folded and put away that dries on the wooden rack. I use the dryer in order to remove wrinkles and to soften the clothes and to speed up the air-drying to daytime only. Our house is small and having a rack of drying clothing is a tripping hazard at night. (I place it purposely in high traffic areas for increased airflow to speed drying time.)</td>
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This exactly. thinner fabrics get folded in half to make better use of the space on dry days. (if it's rainy, forget it) I use it inside mostly, bc i'm too lazy to empty it all off and bring in before bed. I can hang two pairs of jeans on the top of one wooden rack. I usually drape one pair over two bars, to improve air flow for pocket areas. they usually dry in about a day if the heat or A/C is on, or if it's dry fall weather. humid days or early spring tend to take longer, maybe 2 days, but i am sure to rotate to avoid any mildew-smell issues.<br>
we have two racks, one that I've owned for about 10 years (seriously) and one that we got about 5 years ago. they are a tiny bit rickety now, but are still together, and dont cause me any trouble. I can get at least 2 full loads on the two racks.<br>
If positioned right in the back yard, can dry a comforter, sheets, or towels, etc without tipping, even in wind, but it takes "practice" HA! I can't believe i have drying rack practice... I <i>have</i> had a few pairs of undies blow off and fall on the ground at one time or another. no biggie. they dont go far thank goodness.<br><br>
I've never ever had a mildew/mold problem with the wood, and we live in the humid-half-the-year northeastern US. I've also never had a brown mark problem, but maybe that's just luck?<br><br>
i think maybe I paid about $10 for each of them at a big-box type store.
 

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I have this <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FLEIFHEIT-USA-81435-Leifheit-Tower%2Fdp%2FB0002HOUYS%2Fref%3Dsr_1_3%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dhpc%26qid%3D1259875170%26sr%3D8-3" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/LEIFHEIT-USA-8...9875170&sr=8-3</a> and love it!
 

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I have an antique wooden drying rack that looks a lot like the one is the first post, except it's less tall and more long, which is better in the wind. I use mine mostly just for hanging diapers because big laundry like jeans and shirts take up too much room on it and take too long to dry. In the summer I put it out in the sun and in the winter I have in indoors by my woodstove. Great for small loads of laundry. However, I use it almost every day so it can get a little moldy and sometimes leaves brown lines on light laundry. Also . . don't leave it out in the rain because it would probably would make those issues worse.
 

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I have a smaller version of that one you posted, it wouldn't bear the weight of a wet jeans. well, maybe just one pair of wet jeans if I didn't put anything else on it. My 3 yo DD has taken possession of it and uses it to hang her clothes. She does a pretty good job! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"> This one is a perfect fit for her clothes. We use it indoors only.
 
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