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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So from what I read, at week 24 there's a 50/50 chance baby could survive. Any chance that baby could survive is comforting to me! I do hope she stays in quite a while longer though.
 

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I have been wondering what the weekly marker is for that the last few days - I couldn't remember if it was 24 weeks or 26/27 weeks. I could only remember 37 weeks being "full-term." Yay for hitting that milestone! Fingers crossed baby cooks as long as she needs to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah, everything i've been reading online has said 24 weeks is the minimum age for trying to save the baby. Also, the baby has to weigh at least 1 lb. Not too worried about her coming out early though. My last went overdue and I had to be induced due to pre-eclampsia. It's just comforting to know that if she wanted to make a surprise entrance this early, that the doctors would at least try to save her. DH was born pretty early (though he doesn't remember how early). My best guess for how early he was born would be between 28 and 36 weeks since he said it was even early for twins (he's a twin, but his sister actually came out healthy... unlike him.) He said his mom went into labor a few times during the pregnancy and the doctors kept giving her medicine to stop the contractions. One medication they used was albuterol. He now has asthma and is forced to use albuterol when he has an asthma attack. He is terrified that this baby will come out early and have all his health problems. I told him that if the baby did come out too early that we live pretty close to a hospital and would have no problem getting there quickly to save the baby. I also reminded him that the birth center I'm delivering at is 2-3 minutes from a hospital. I gave my midwives a heads up about his fears in case it came up during labor. They thanked me and said they'd work hard to reassure him every time they check on baby during labor and if he ends up attending any appointments.
 

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One medication they used was albuterol. He now has asthma and is forced to use albuterol when he has an asthma attack.
Being a preemie puts you at a significantly higher risk for developing asthma and other respiratory disorders anyway. Implying that the albuterol was causal (vs. the correlation you're making) is flawed logic.

Yes, 24 weeks is a 50/50 chance of survival. That said, the likelihood of significant developmental and/or physical issues remains high. Those risks decrease with each week gained, but even at 35 weeks things aren't "done." The baby doesn't even have the sulci and gyri (the ridges) on the brain at that time!

It's still a great feeling to make it to that point. Each week at a time, right?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah I think it's true that the majority of the issues he has have more to do with his being premature than what medication his mom took while pregnant. He seems to think it's only the medication though. I believe another factor was his placement in the placenta. I hear at times one twin can have a more favorable placement in the placenta and get more nutrients. Whatever the reason, his sister clearly received more nutrients than he did and developed normally. She was able to breathe on her own when they were born, he was not. You are probably right that albuterol had nothing to do with his asthma, because wouldn't his sister have the same problem if that was the case?
 

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that albuterol had nothing to do with his asthma, because wouldn't his sister have the same problem if that was the case?
Possibly but not necessarily. Being fraternal twins also means their DNA makeup is different, so which genes get turned on vs. off when exposed to specific environmental conditions would be a huge factor as well.

There was a gal in my DDC last time who had fraternal twins. They were delivered at 36 weeks because the girl had severe IUGR and was born at around 2.5 pounds. Her brother was almost 8 pounds. In that situation, it would seem that something like better placental placement (or larger placenta?) may have something to do with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
@FluffyFlamingo IUGR sounds spot on for him. He was significantly smaller than his twin, couldn't keep his temperature, and struggled to breathe. Not sure of his birth weight, but it might be on his birth certificate. I'll have to look.
 

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I know there can also be structural issues with the umbilical cord that can cause nutrition deficiency, resulting in IUGR. One artery instead of two (though that doesn't necessarily cause a problem, as it's a common variation but less favorable), strictures in the vessels, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I may never know all the details. He's not in touch with any member of his family (because of serious past issues) so I couldn't get all the info from them. All i've got is what he remembers being told to him by his mom.

The good news is my baby seems to be very active and growing well. My first DD was 8lbs 6oz and I expect this baby to follow suit and be plenty plump as well. Funny thing is that baby size at birth doesn't seem to matter too much in the long run. My girl is a dainty little thing now.
 

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Sounds like you and bubs are doing well! That's great!

My DD was a peanut - 7 pounds 1 ounce at birth and went down to 6 pounds 3 ounces. She was always long and thin, high on the height charts and low on weight. She still is. :D
 
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