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How soon are you going back to work after baby gets here?<br><br>
DH and I are looking at a couple of houses this week, and are just getting even MORE antsy than we have been to get into our own place- the reality of four people in that little room looming closer and closer is making me claustrophobic! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> Whether we buy or rent, we want to be able to move by March at the VERY latest. So we've decided that after baby is here I need to get at least a part-time job to both help pay off some things and to build a savings, and to help with bills once we do move. We won't have to worry about paying for childcare- my parents will watch the kids, and if they can't my inlaws will. We're very fortunate in that case. (Although I have considered trying to find a family to nanny for that will allow me to bring the baby and just leaving dd with my folks- since she's friends with their other daycare kids.)<br><br>
Anyway....I'm just wondering how soon you plan to start pumping to save up a freezer stash of milk, how much milk you plan to have saved back, things like that. I didn't work until dd was 4 months old, so BFing was well established at that time. I'm worried about how different it may be with a newborn. I'll probably start turning in applications around the middle of January, with intent to go to work around six weeks pp. I don't want to work more than around 25-30 hours a week, if that makes a difference.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lurk.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lurk">:<br><br>
I have to go back after 6 weeks, so I'm pretty curious about this whole thing too.
 

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I'm going back at 10 weeks, possibly 11 weeks-actually I want to procrastinate the whole thing but I know I can't!<br><br>
I am BFARing-so my situation may be different. I have to start pumping basically right away because I have to trick my body into producing alot of milk. So I'll probably start saving my milk at about 1 week PP. It won't be alot (5 minutes after each feeding)-but something.<br><br>
I'll exclusively feed at the breast for 6 weeks-then introduce the bottle with my EBM. BY 10 weeks-I hope to be able to have the baby switching from bottle to breast.<br><br>
My disclaimer is that I am beginning to pump early for medical reasons! However-I don't think it will hurt to get used to pumping and having lots of EBM frozen and saved up!
 

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My situation is a little different too. I plan on taking a full four weeks off, then depending on how I feel, starting to do a little work from home, then from about eight weeks trying to take the baby to work with me. I don't know how that will work out, but my mom did it for a while with her oldest and my bosses are down to try it. I'd probably have MIL watch the baby a day or two a week and take him with me three or four days, so I will have to start pumping at around six weeks or so. But I don't even want to try bottle feeding before eight weeks if I can avoid it.<br>
If this were another country where the government offered paid maternity leave, I'd love to take at least three or four months off. But SAHM'ing has never really been an option. I love my career and even if I wanted to stay home, I'd have to sell my house to afford it.
 

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I'll be staying home as long as FMLA will allow, which is 12 weeks. After that point, I'll be working part-time for (hopefully!) about three months. My boss is willing to work with me on this, and my husband has a pretty flexible work schedule, so he'll be able to be home with the baby for four hours each day while I work. Eventually (when baby is about six months old), I'll be back at work full-time. I wish we could afford for me to work part-time indefinitely, but it's just not a possibility.<br><br>
Re: BFing ... I'm actually attending a "Breastfeeding and Working (and Pumping)" class this evening, and I'm going to ask them how to plan on the transition. I'm going to have to be able to pump/have baby take a bottle before going back part-time, of course, so that my husband can feed the baby while I'm at work. But I'm hoping the fact that I'll be working part-time before returning full-time will get both me and the baby physically and emotionally prepared to transition to eight hours without each other each day. (Although thankfully, I'll be able to go to the baby's daycare at lunch every day to BF too.)
 

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I'm not much help but I'm glad you started this thread. Its a topic I need all the info I can get.<br><br>
I plan on going back to work as soon as my body is healed enough. Maybe 2 weeks if its an uneventful vag del. I will take baby with me. She has already been dubbed the "Assistant Sexton", very cute. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I choose my own hours and days though, so I guess its diff for me. BFing around relatively hard labor is what concerns me. I plan to feed right b4 I start to work, and hope it will hold her til I am done, planning to work about 2hours at a time, rest an hour, feed, back to work, and so on, until the place is gleaming again.<br><br>
I am also planning on starting my own business! All I need is a license and some simple advertisement. I feel a cleaning business will take off very fast, as I already have an excellent rep from cleaning our church. It gets lots of exposure being a student center and chapel too and ppl who have been members for a while have really noticed its "transformation". I know I will pick up a few clients immediately from the church, but I am trying to find the best way to explain that my baby will most def be with me while I work, atleast until she is mobile.<br><br>
I plan on pumping and freezing asap too. My cousin has a 9 month old that REFUSES to take a bottle. She nurses in the morning before work and waits til mommy gets home at 3:30 to nurse. She will however take some baby foods, but no bottle, no way. Yikes.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>countrycountess</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9830274"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I plan to feed right b4 I start to work, and hope it will hold her til I am done, planning to work about 2hours at a time, rest an hour, feed, back to work, and so on, until the place is gleaming again.</div>
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In my own experience, the first 6 weeks were pretty round the clock nursing till baby got his days and nights straight. Then we started to settle into a pattern where he'd nurse on his own schedule. For us it was every 90 minutes. Not sayig everyone is like that, just pointing out that given enough time and boobie access, baby will regulate themselves according to what they need.<br><br>
If your business is cleaning, I totally completely and absolutely recommend babywearing. I kept my house clean once baby was born by wearing him. When I learned to wear him on my back it was even easier! He loooooved sleeping in there and I could nurse hands free!
 

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I'm taking 8 wks, then going back to work part time. I'm looking for advice on when to start pumping too! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/notes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="notes">:
 

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I'm not returning to work until Baby is 5-6mos old (I happen to work for a company with EXTREMELY generous maternity leave policies - at least for the US - I get 2 wks b/4 the birth paid, 12 wks after, and I'm taking a couple of months of unpaid leave of absence after that). I did the same with DS, and for him I never built up a freezer stash ahead of time. I found that what I pumped at work each day (3x/day, working f/t) was sufficient to meet his needs. At the time he had barely started solids so was still pretty much EBF, and he ended up reverse cycling so I don't think he drank as much during the day as he might have otherwise. I also found that offering the breast more frequently on the weekends helped keep my supply consistent.<br><br>
If you're only going to be working p/t, you may find that you don't need to have much milk on hand at all (if it's only for a few hours). I've heard stories of babes who NEVER took a bottle and would just wait for mama to come back to get their bm from the tap! (and were none the worse for it, other than completely stressing out Mama!)<br><br>
The other thing I would take into consideration is that you may simply be too exhausted bf'ing around the clock with a nb to even think about pumping!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Kharen</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9829993"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Re: BFing ... I'm actually attending a "Breastfeeding and Working (and Pumping)" class this evening, and I'm going to ask them how to plan on the transition.</div>
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Cool, report back and let us know if you get any good info out of it.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>newmamatobe</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Cool, report back and let us know if you get any good info out of it.</div>
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I certainly shall! I'm hoping I get some good information tonight.
 

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You should also x-post in Working Moms!<br><br>
Unfortunately, I will not be returning to work <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/gloomy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Gloomy">: since we cannot deal with the stress of me working w/ 3 DD's under 4yo!<br><br>
But I've done it twice, so here's me advice:<br><br>
> Start pumping by 3-4 weeks. Pump after feeding and/or in the middle of the longest nursing "break" of the day (i.e. if baby sleeps for 4 hours, pump at 2 hours). Introduce a bottle at this point.<br><br>
> Start a freezer stash ASAP. Don't just pump and feed the expressed milk.<br>
The reason: Trick your body into producing "too much" milk. It is easier to increase supply at this point than anytime after the 6-8 "adjustment" that your body will go through.<br><br>
First freezer "bottles": You may only pump 1/2 to 1 oz at a time. Pour it into the container you plan to freeze in and keep it in the fridge. Next time you pump, add the milk to the fridge bottle. Do this for about 48 hours or until you have whatever amount you want to freeze (2.5-3 oz is good). Then freeze the container. This way you aren't having to freeze 1 oz (or less) everytime.<br><br>
Plan to pump AT LEAST as many times as baby nurses for the first 2-3 weeks at work. After that, you MIGHT be able to cut down.<br><br>
That's what I've got off the top of my head . . .<br>
Good Luck!<br>
--LEE
 

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We have our own business and i will be returning for my normal shifts (Friday and Saturday from 6-9pm) as soon as I can walk properly. I worked last Friday night but not Saturday. I can bring baby, I plan to wear her in a Moby.
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>leewd</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9831446"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You should also x-post in Working Moms!<br><br>
Unfortunately, I will not be returning to work <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/gloomy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Gloomy">: since we cannot deal with the stress of me working w/ 3 DD's under 4yo!<br><br>
But I've done it twice, so here's me advice:<br><br>
> Start pumping by 3-4 weeks. Pump after feeding and/or in the middle of the longest nursing "break" of the day (i.e. if baby sleeps for 4 hours, pump at 2 hours). Introduce a bottle at this point.<br><br>
> Start a freezer stash ASAP. Don't just pump and feed the expressed milk.<br>
The reason: Trick your body into producing "too much" milk. It is easier to increase supply at this point than anytime after the 6-8 "adjustment" that your body will go through.<br><br>
First freezer "bottles": You may only pump 1/2 to 1 oz at a time. Pour it into the container you plan to freeze in and keep it in the fridge. Next time you pump, add the milk to the fridge bottle. Do this for about 48 hours or until you have whatever amount you want to freeze (2.5-3 oz is good). Then freeze the container. This way you aren't having to freeze 1 oz (or less) everytime.<br><br>
Plan to pump AT LEAST as many times as baby nurses for the first 2-3 weeks at work. After that, you MIGHT be able to cut down.<br><br>
That's what I've got off the top of my head . . .<br>
Good Luck!<br>
--LEE</div>
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Thanks, that's really useful. I just coped and pasted that into my "postpartum info" file.
 

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I'm lucky, because I work from home, although I'll probably need to start some travel again at around 3 months, which is a whole other issue entirely. But with my first, I started working a full day from my home office at 6 weeks pp and then began commuting an hour and a half each day 4X week at 12 weeks pp (which I HATED!) My husband is a SAHDad, so at least one of us could be with her, but my commute plus the long hours my job required made it so tough--I cried every day. I was so jealous he got to be with her.<br><br>
Anyway, my experience may not be super-encouraging but I share it anyway just to show you that even with the best of mommy planning, babies don't get to share in the plan, so things can go off course and still work out okay in the end:<br><br>
I had done a lot of prep and reading on this ahead of time, and took a breastfeeding and work course. I breastfed exclusively for the first 2 weeks but at week 3 started to offer one bottle of EBM a day, just to be sure DD got familiar and used to it. I had TONS of milk, so wasn't terribly worried about supply, but started pumping a little here and there so that I would be used to the pump and have some milk ready to go. DD was GREAT with this--we thought "How lucky!" We, too, had seen some bf babies who refused a bottle, so knowing we had no choice we wanted to be prepared. We continued giving her a bottle of EBM a day, even with me there (Daddy gave it to her) until I returned to work outside the house at 12 weeks pp.<br><br>
Did I mention DD is very stubborn?? Well, the first morning of the first day Mama was gone, she was unhappy but took several bottles. That afternoon, she refused. The next day, screamed all day, refused to eat. And the next, and the next. We were first time parents, and FRANTIC. My husband would call me at work at his wits end, I worked too far away for him to drive her to me to nurse. I cried nearly every day in the office (nice professional showing.) I left work early several times in a panic to get home to her. We tried every bottle, every nipple, every suggestion. We took her to the pediatrician. Everyone kept telling us, "when she's hungry enough, she'll eat." Well, as it turned out, even though I was gone a good 12 hours a day, DD never did really take to eating from that darn bottle. But she sure as heck figured out when mama was home--she began moving all her eating to night, and literally nursed all night long. I got used to sleeping with her attached to me the entire night. She always gained weight and was strong and healthy, I pumped plenty at work so my milk supply was still good for the weekends and holidays when I was home, and she eventually would take (with a lot of coaxing and never without tears) maybe one to two bottles from dh during that long 12-hour stretch I'd be gone every day. We nursed for nearly 2 years, even with me traveling on business (by then she was old enough to take the bottle or eat other food, and I tried to limit my nights away to 1 or none if I could help it, even if it meant a very early morning flight out and a very late-night flight home). And I got very used to that pump--it was my mechanical best friend.<br><br>
DD's now a very, very strong, healthy, smart, talkative (and super-tall) 2 1/2 year old. So I guess I share this to say definitely plan, but if things don't go the way you planned, it's not necessarily the end of the world. Trust your body and your baby, and be willing to be flexible. Just my little two cents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>leewd</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9831446"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><br>
But I've done it twice, so here's me advice:<br><br>
> Start pumping by 3-4 weeks. Pump after feeding and/or in the middle of the longest nursing "break" of the day (i.e. if baby sleeps for 4 hours, pump at 2 hours). Introduce a bottle at this point.<br><br>
> Start a freezer stash ASAP. Don't just pump and feed the expressed milk.<br>
The reason: Trick your body into producing "too much" milk. It is easier to increase supply at this point than anytime after the 6-8 "adjustment" that your body will go through.<br><br>
First freezer "bottles": You may only pump 1/2 to 1 oz at a time. Pour it into the container you plan to freeze in and keep it in the fridge. Next time you pump, add the milk to the fridge bottle. Do this for about 48 hours or until you have whatever amount you want to freeze (2.5-3 oz is good). Then freeze the container. This way you aren't having to freeze 1 oz (or less) everytime.<br><br>
Plan to pump AT LEAST as many times as baby nurses for the first 2-3 weeks at work. After that, you MIGHT be able to cut down.</div>
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Thank you- those are all wonderful tips! And things I feel like I should know since I pumped while working and going to school starting when dd was 2 months until she was 13 months...but it's amazing how much of it I forgot! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/innocent.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shy">
 

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Mom2Liv - thanks for sharing your story, it definitely reminds me of some of the things I went through with ds. I had trouble pumping, it actually made me think maybe I wasn't producing enough milk, even though my ds was hugely rolly polly, but I found that I could worry about anything to do with him, especially in those first few months. I ended up needing to rent a hospital grade pump and bigger shields, so I just wanted to throw that out there to everyone. Keep trying what you need to try to get things to work. I will be trying to go back around 12 weeks for maybe 20 hours - but I haven't worked since dd was born so it will all be new to me. I remember it being really hard with ds, but my dh will be at home with the baby, so hopefully that will help.
 

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One more thing:<br><br>
I LIVED on Fenugreek because without it I couldn't possibly have pumped enough! This is the MAJOR reason I advocate starting to pump EARLY!<br><br>
With DD1 I did not start early enough and it was nearly impossible to pump enough. With DD2, I started much earlier and we did much better.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 
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