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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi There,
We are implementing a program at our martial arts school, for students 12 and older, that focuses on having a good Attitude and Being a Role Model (things we feel are important for our students).

We want them to do a worksheet for each section about a particular word and I need some help creating them or finding already made worksheets.

The words we are planning to use are:
Attitude
Teamwork
Self-Discipline
Courtesy
Confidence
Courage
Appreciation
Charity
Achievement


Can anybody help point me in the right direction or give me some ideas for good questions (maybe short answer) that would be good to use or that you would like to see on a worksheet of this nature?!
 

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Honestly? My initial reaction is "Ugh, worksheets are not why I would send my child to martial arts."

I'm not sure exactly what your goal is, but a worksheet seems like the type of thing that would encourage bare-minimum, superficial effort, especially for kids in typical schools who do that type of thing all day. It's an easy way to see their thought process and get physical proof that they actually did the assignment, but it may not be particularly meaningful.

That said, it seems to me that you could put together something that encourages kids to explore the ideas, what they mean to them and within their family/belief structure, ways in which they are currently lacking in those areas, and plans to change.

For example:

How would you describe the word?

How do your parents or other important adult in your life describe it?

Look up the dictionary definition. Does your personal, family, and/or dojo definition differ? If so, how?

Think of one way you could change your own life to to better exemplify the value (or something like that. I'm totally just making this all up off the top of my head). Concentrate on implementing it every day for a week/month/whatever, and write about your experience.

If you're willing, letting them be creative and express this in whatever way works best for them (writing, art, video, in-class presentation, etc.) might make it more meaningful.
 

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Ditto to ocelotmom's post. Worksheets are about the last thing I'd want from my kids' martial arts program, and these particular words and concepts seem like they are totally at odds with the typical closed-ended questions you find on worksheets. Discussion and stories is where I would go with those words.

If I had to do something on paper, I'd ask kids to suggest a book, story, personal experience or movie that they thought exemplified the value in question, and be prepared to explain their example to others.

Miranda
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank You for the ideas. The worksheets are purely a portion of the optional extra program for students who want more than just the kicking and punching part of martial arts. We do work on the mental aspect in our regular classes, but like I said this is an extra thing for the students who want more. The students in this program help with younger/lower belt students, do projects & presentations, perform at demonstrations and volunteer their time all to earn patches and to spend time with their fellow students and friends while learning the martial arts.
 

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I've been involved with aikido for many years, and my son also trained, both as a child and a teen. I'm sure I would have complained if he had ever been given worksheets - but here's a lovely little video in which a children's aikido class discusses the kind of things you're wanting to include - and much of it is also an inherent part of the ongoing physical/energy training traditions. This video includes just a small sample of some wonderful ongoing discussions that seem to accomplish more than what I would think written things could. If you keep watching, you'll see where it goes on into the body of the physical training itself with the mention of "connection," "harmony," "mindfulness," "sharing," etc.

By the way, this class consists of homeschoolers - unsocialized, y'know. One wonders how they ever managed to learn how to stand in a line or follow directions... But seriously, it's pretty beautiful - worth a watch.
Lillian
 

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I have to second the discussion idea. So much more depth comes out of hearing others' perspectives.

If you have to have a writing assignment, I'd still follow up with a discussion. But I'd be cautious about giving assignments outside of the program time. When I was in high school, another writing assignment would simply not have happened and if it were a requirement for being in the program, I would've had to drop out and would've suffered.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by moominmamma View Post
Discussion and stories is where I would go with those words.
Yes - in the classes I mentioned in my last post, they've had amazing discussions in which individuals have been able to volunteer stories of their personal observations about how they've found ways to function more harmoniously. - Lillian
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Lillian J View Post
here's a lovely little video in which a children's aikido class discusses the kind of things you're wanting to include - and much of it is also an inherent part of the ongoing physical/energy training traditions.

How wonderful! We're part of an aikido dojo that is also mostly unschoolers that has a very similar feel. Our sensei finds moments and incidents within the flow of the classes to highlight values and discuss the principles and actions that support them. And often he finishes class with a parable or folk tale from one of the various eastern philosophical traditions. I love that it's all integrated

Miranda
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
We do plan to do discussions as well. And thank you for the video. At a previous school I taught at we did a similar program and the kids and teens loved it! They had no problems doing the worksheets, projects, and discussions they all quite enjoyed it and especially loved getting their new patches. And it is a purely voluntary program. So if the student (or the parents) does not want to do it, they don't have to.
 
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