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My dd is soon to be 16 and is not interested in attending high school, and we were not impressed with the local community college. If you were an unschooler, or have an unschooler who went on to college, or have an older teen who is planning on higher ed, can you please share a little what that journey looks/looked like? Did you do any prep? SATs or the like? We'd especially like to hear from people who skipped high school and community college. Thanks for any thoughts. We are looking for some real life stories...we don't know that many IRL unschooling teens and none who have gone this route.
 

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well, i wasn't unschooled or homeschooled but i dropped out of high school at 16, got my GED, signed up for the SAT's, did really super awful on them, took the university entrance exams, did super awful on them, and got in anyway<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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UUmom, my daughter skipped high school but did do community college. Ours was definitely not top of the line, but it was pretty small and very personal. Some of the teachers were amazing, and some were very lacking. I feel like she learned just as much (about the world) when she happened to be in a class with a less than ideal teacher. We had a lot of interesting discussions about it.<br><br>
What are your main complaints with yours? Are they things that might not matter? What I loved about my daughter's experience was that everything she did counted towards her degree...everything. She took care of all her basic core classes and we did it very cheaply too. High school seems like a huge waste when I look at it this way.<br><br>
One benefit (at least in our experience) was that the fact that she attended community college made it so that SAT's were not necessary for acceptance into the four year university. That was a real plus!
 

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One of my son's did the community college route, another went to a private college, and my daughters took more untraditional routes to higher education.<br><br>
You can prepare for college sat tests with the same information that highschool kids have, as it is available at the public libraries. If your child is motivated to go to a college that requires the sat or act then just talk to your local librarian, find a SAT prep book that you like, and start studying.<br><br>
You can create your own highschool transcripts using whatever name you choose for your "homeschool" and/or you can write essays discribing your child's unique unschooled education. Many Universities are eager to accept homeschooled kids with unique educational experiences and an eagerness to learn.<br><br>
good luck!<br><br>
Oh, there are also umbrella schools like Clonlara School in Ann Arbor Michigan that you can enroll in for the highschool years. clonlara does not give you a curriculum but provides guidelines for establishing "highschool credits" and a "diploma" which some people find helpful in applying for college.
 

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I was unschooled from the age of 11 on. I began community college classes at around 13, and took the CHSPE (California High School Proficiency Exam) around 16. I did not skip Community College, but without SATs or any high school level coursework of any kind (nor middle school level for that matter), got excellent grades in college, transferred to the (state) university of my choice, and graduated with honors. Eventually I went on to get a graduate degree as well. I happen to be good at schoolish work, so I'm not saying this would work for everybody, but it is certainly an option!<br><br>
Sarah
 

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my unschooled daughter, now 22, decided to go to a highschool at 15, finished in a year and a half, and went on to a community college that only required entrance placement exams. She wanted to do it, so made short work of what was required to use the tool of school. She ended up getting her AA on scholarships.<br><br>
You might consider getting him a copy of Grace Llewelyns 'Teenaged Liberation Handbook' ...awesome book with tons of ideas for how to get where they want to be next, using the system, learning on their own the things they need or finding out how to find out, all that sortof thing....a very empowering book for young people, and anyone else, really!<br>
My son is 23 months old and I have just finished reading it again...lol.
 
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