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This is just a hypothetical question. I don't know if DS is gifted or not. I am, so I suppose there is a higher chance for him to gifted. I would say he's probably not profoundly gifted, but may be moderately so.<br><br>
DS attends a private preschool where every child works at their own pace. He's the youngest in his class (the age range is 3-6), so there is no shortage of materials that will challenge him for a long time.<br><br>
I don't know if we will try to transfer him to public school at some point. My question is, if we don't, is there any reason to have him tested, other than to satisfy my mild curiosity? Is there an ideal age or time to test? I'm not familiar with how things are done these days, but back when I was in public school, I was identified in 2nd grade through a standardized written test and then with an administered IQ test. If we keep him in the private school I don't think they would ever test him because there is no need to accelerate him if he is always allowed to work at his own pace.<br><br>
On another note, if DS was gifted, would it be very obvious to me at this point (3 yo)? He definitely seems "smart" and his verbal abilities are advanced, but I'm not amazed by his ability to do puzzles or anything like that. He does seem to have an unusually high level of empathy for his age and seems to understand a lot of abstract ideas. That and his verbal skills are his most prominent abilities. I have a hard time judging these things because I went to school with gifted/advanced kids and DS is my only child, so I think my basis for comparison is skewed.<br><br>
Sorry, I didn't mean to turn this into a "is my child gifted" post, I'm really more interested my question about testing!
 

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I might test later (much later: my DCs are only 3 and 5) IF, and this is a big IF, it would help me in understanding him and her.<br><br>
I came to this forum when my DD was young, but ended up finding a lot of info, like asynchronous development, which helped me understand my DS much better. If an IQ test might help me understand my children better, then I may be interested. I can't imagine the usefulness of just a number, like 120, or 140... but if it broke the test into skills, interests.... that may be helpful to me, and/or interesting to my child.
 

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I imagine my children might opt to be tested later on, if they wanted to participate in summer programs and the like that were open only to gifted kids.<br><br>
Since we plan to homeschool, I can't see any reason to do it now. I don't need to know my child's IQ score in order to provide her with appropriately individualized learning experiences! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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We intend to test around age 6, which I've heard is best for avoiding ceiling issues while still being fairly reliable. I think it's a piece of information that could prove to be important. And since test ceilings might (or might not) come into play for us, waiting to see if we want the information later isn't really an option. I guess another part of the reason we want to test early is less rational and more visceral: DH & I were both identified later than would have been optimal, and we both wish that we had been tested earlier so that reasonable accomodations could have been made.<br><br>
As far as being able to identify a 3-year-old kid as gifted or not, I think that is often not possible. My DD is 3, and I'm confident that she is gifted, but I do think that there are plenty of kids who are not obvious or recognized at that age. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>no5no5</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14677355"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">And since test ceilings might (or might not) come into play for us, waiting to see if we want the information later isn't really an option.</div>
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What are the negative implications of having one's child encounter the test ceiling? Are there any practical downsides to simply knowing that a child's IQ is untestable? Are there programs they wouldn't be able to qualify for, for example?<br><br>
Thanks for any insight you can provide, as this is not an issue I've given much thought to.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>skueppers</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14696527"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">What are the negative implications of having one's child encounter the test ceiling? Are there any practical downsides to simply knowing that a child's IQ is untestable? Are there programs they wouldn't be able to qualify for, for example?<br><br>
Thanks for any insight you can provide, as this is not an issue I've given much thought to.</div>
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Well, the downside really is just that you don't know, and will never know, your child's level of giftedness. Even within the gifted community there is a huge range of abilities. They say that HG kids are as much different from MG kids as MG kids are from ND kids. So if you test your child and all you learn is that he or she is gifted, and not how gifted, that's only a small part of the picture.<br><br>
I'd liken it to measuring your height with a five-foot ruler. If the question is just whether you are tall enough to go on an amusement park ride, the ruler will be fine. And it will work perfectly for people five feet and under. But if you are trying to tailor clothing for someone who is taller than the measuring stick, it's not helpful. It makes a big difference whether they're only just five feet tall, or whether they're six feet tall, or more.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>no5no5</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14697320"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'd liken it to measuring your height with a five-foot ruler. If the question is just whether you are tall enough to go on an amusement park ride, the ruler will be fine. And it will work perfectly for people five feet and under. But if you are trying to tailor clothing for someone who is taller than the measuring stick, it's not helpful. It makes a big difference whether they're only just five feet tall, or whether they're six feet tall, or more.</div>
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I see your point. Are the test ceilings really that low? I always imagined that while a test might not be able to distinguish between someone with a 160 IQ and someone with a 180 IQ, that they'd be able to tell the difference between 130 and 150.<br><br>
As you can see, I don't know much about this! My only experience with IQ testing is having been tested myself, when I was five and again when I was seven.<br><br>
Oh, and I totally agree that the kids who were more gifted than I was growing up were as different from me as I was from the non-gifted kids I knew. I have no idea what IQ test scores were involved; it was just one of those things that was obvious to all of us.
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>skueppers</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14698782"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I see your point. Are the test ceilings really that low? I always imagined that while a test might not be able to distinguish between someone with a 160 IQ and someone with a 180 IQ, that they'd be able to tell the difference between 130 and 150.</div>
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These things make my head spin a bit, and I am certainly not an expert. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Maybe someone who is can step in and explain it?<br><br>
My two cents: I have read that the WISC is really not intended for kids who score 3 standard deviations above the mean. I think that includes kids who have FSIQs of 145 and also those who have subtest scores in that range. So if you don't hit the ceiling on any of the subtests, I think your score is likely to be accurate (be it 130 or 140). If you get up to the 145+ range (or a 16-17+ subtest score), you can't be sure your score is accurate. Since you could have one or several subtest scores in that range and still have a full scale score in the 130s (or even lower), even scores in the 130s are potentially suspect.
 
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