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Discussion Starter #1
Interesting article in the Guardian discussing dilemma of some British parents - should they pay for Men B vaccine? Would you?

http://gu.com/p/4t7j4?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

I'm not sure. My (current) kids are too old to need this now, so this is also theoretical for me.

But we didn't get pay to get varicella for our youngest (not offered on nhs schedule in uk) and I have regretted that (he's fine apart from latent shingles and a scar on his nose, but it was 2 weeks of misery we could have all done without).
 

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I'm considering this for when my kids are in the senior years of high school and in that second highest risk group. It's not covered here in Australia for any age group. I'm hoping that more data on effectiveness is available by then. If it proves effective and with a reasonable duration of protection (right now that hasn't been demonstrated), and I'm content with the safety profile as more info becomes available, then yes, I probably would. I have paid anyway for some of my kids vaccines as we were doing them privately off the schedule and off the registry, so the issue of individual vs government responsibility re: funding is not particularly relevant for me. Men B is the most common strain here (as it is in other countries I'm sure since the incidence of C declined with the introduction of the vaccine).

My niece's former high school drama teacher is still in the ICU right now over six weeks on. His wife didn't provide info on what strain of bacterial meningitis he contracted, but he's lost one leg, is due for multiple skin grafts, has minimal kidney function, and his long term prognosis is still uncertain. He thought he was coming down with ther flu or a stomach bug when he went to hospital that evening at the end of February. Within 12 hours he was on life support. One disconcerting aspect is the speed at which the disease can wreak havoc on the body.
 

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I'd pay for it. Meningitis scares the crap out of me. I am going to ask about it at my daughter's 12 month check-up and my son's 4 year visit (it may be too late for him - I'll see what they recommend). At the end of the day, I'd never forgive myself if one of my kids came down with it and I had turned the vaccine down.
 

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So the main risk groups are infants and college goers?

I find all the different versions of meningitis a bit confusing honestly. What's the common factor in them all?
 

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So the main risk groups are infants and college goers?

I find all the different versions of meningitis a bit confusing honestly. What's the common factor in them all?
Based on the reading I've done on government websites over the years, the groups at highest risk by age tend to be infants and toddlers (1st) followed by (2nd) teens and young adults (like 15-24). The outbreak we had in my province back in Canada in 1999 started with 15-19 year olds.

There's probably loads out there on common factors, risk factors (besides age), what role vaccination is playing in the different strains (ie. once mass vaccination for C started, it declined in circulation and B is predominant in many areas now).

My niece's drama teacher wasn't vaccinated for meningococcal I believe as he's a similar age as I am and it wasn't on the schedule for us when we were younger and not generally recommended as a catch up vaccine either. I suppose working in a high school was a risk factor to be considered.

I know Canada hasn't instituted any recommendations re: the Men B vaccine yet, but Australia has recommended it for young children (particularly under 24 months), adolescents aged 15-19, people with medical conditions that put them at high risk (asplenia), and lab personnel.
http://www.immunise.health.gov.au/internet/immunise/publishing.nsf/Content/1C08CC86CFF8FE00CA257E29000F7E06/$File/ATAGI-advice-bexsero.pdf
 
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