Mothering Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I had an appointment with my new Family Practice Doctor on Tuesday. We went over a bunch of stuff including my family history of Alzheimer's (Dad died of it, 4 Aunts of my Mom's sisters died with it and my Mom is dying of it right now). She feels I should see another Doc about it. She recommended two differnt Docs. One is a Neurologist, but he isn't accepting any new patients. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> The other guy is actually in Geriatrics but is very knowledgeable about Alzheimer's. So do I pull the wool over my eyes and ignore this? Or pursue it to see if I should be taking medication or herbs/vitamin supplements as a precaution.<br><br>
I don't know what any new research is saying about this. Anyone know?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,474 Posts
I don't think it would hurt to go see what they have to say.<br><br>
Personally I would never take any drug as a preventative for a disease I don't have. Herbs/supplements absolutely. I may go get an MD's opinion, but I would probably go see an ND for preventative measures
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
But do ND's specialize in Alzheimer's?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,474 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>KatWrangler</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14752751"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">But do ND's specialize in Alzheimer's?</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
no, that's why I would go see whatever specialist they are reccomending you see, however I would never take drugs to treat a disease I don't have....<br><br>
an ND may be able to offer you a different prespective that's all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
I have a similar situation, and I take fish oil, resveratrol and turmeric. I also eat healthy foods and work out almost every day. Lots of sleep is important also, and low stress. Sounds simple, but of course it is not!<br><br>
A naturopath may help you, but I would do some on-line poking around -- you'll get just as much info. You don't really need to take any meds until you start noticing symptoms -- the problem is that you (and people around you) need to be very vigilant and see the neurologist at the very first suspicions. The sooner you start on the meds, the less deterioration you will have, and the slower it will be. It helps to know the exact age your relatives started having symptoms -- it will give you a rough age to anticipate, although it could happen much earlier for you.<br><br>
It's awful to think about, isn't it? But I believe by caring for myself now I am delaying it or hopefully preventing it altogether.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,138 Posts
I'd see someone. They do have some drugs to slow/delay progression now should you begin progression. I've seen some new promising treatments/clinical trials in the news in the last year. You may not be old enough to participate in any trials but if you begin to show mild stuff maybe you could do the other drugs and that would hold you stable as they made progress and then you participate in one of the promising trials. I'd want someone following me so I knew when I was showing signs and needed to take action. And it seems like the guy who sees it all the time could do that for you.<br><br>
My son has a horrible disease that's progressive (mitochondrial disorder). But I have solid reason to hope there will be an effective treatment in his life. I think the same for you. I really do...not just pie in the sky but because of the progress in neurodegenerative areas that's being made now.<br><br>
There is overlap in my son's condition and Alzheimers (and most neurodegenerative things really). I admit I'm not up on the current research in that area but look into coq10 and see where they are with that in the research. I doubt it would be treatment based on how it works with mito and parkinsons and the like but more preventing declines. I believe the promising treatment (there isn't one now, just slowing progression and trying to protect) for my son's condition is also related to coq10 in some way but it's all secretive now.<br><br>
My son's geneticist uses epic4health brands only <a href="http://www.epic4health.com/" target="_blank">http://www.epic4health.com/</a> (Tischon corp makes them and this is what is used in clinical trials and has far superior effects in the body). Using only that form is typical for those treating mitochondrial and related disorders. You don't use over the counter at the drugstore stuff. See where the research is with coq10 and Alzheimer's. If the research is still supporting it start it now (the Tischon forms...I can tell you what I take myself).<br>
Here is an example of the link between mitochondrial function and Alzheimer's and potential of coq10. <a href="http://www.springerlink.com/content/q73h34w477970236/" target="_blank">http://www.springerlink.com/content/q73h34w477970236/</a><br><br>
Another: <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17192765" target="_blank">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17192765</a><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a powerful antioxidant that buffers the potential adverse consequences of free radicals produced during oxidative phosphorylation in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Oxidative stress, resulting in glutathione loss and oxidative DNA and protein damage, has been implicated in many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. Experimental studies in animal models suggest that CoQ10 may protect against neuronal damage that is produced by ischemia, atherosclerosis and toxic injury. Though most have tended to be pilot studies, there are published preliminary clinical trials showing that CoQ10 may offer promise in many brain disorders.</td>
</tr></table></div>
Parkinson's has proven response in my understanding (as does mito).<br><a href="http://iospress.metapress.com/content/rk504221826mkg70/" target="_blank">http://iospress.metapress.com/content/rk504221826mkg70/</a><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Our results suggest that oral CoQ may be a viable antioxidant strategy for neurodegenerative disease. Our data supports a trial of CoQ in an animal model of AD in order to determine whether a clinical trial is warranted.</td>
</tr></table></div>
AD=Alzheimer's Disease and CoQ=oral coq10 adiminstration<br><br><br><br>
edited to add: I found this <a href="http://www.epic4health.com/lcarandotcon.html" target="_blank">http://www.epic4health.com/lcarandotcon.html</a> Andrew takes carintine as well for his stuff. You could easily do that if research is supporting it.<br><br>
Dosing recommendations for mito are:<br>
CoQ10 5 – 15 mg/kg/day (Tischon forms)<br><br>
Levo-carnitine<br>
(Carnitor) Variable, starting dose of 30 mg/kg/day, typical maximum of 100 mg/kg/day<br><br>
Acetyl-L-Carnitine 250 – 1000 mg per day (I think acetyl is mentioned above/it's probably better absorbed and maybe more effective in the brain but more expensive and not prescription).<br><br>
I'm saying there is hope.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/hug2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Hug2">
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,212 Posts
<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/hug2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Hug2"><br><br>
What a tough situation. How old are you? How old were your parents when diagnosed? Are you seeing any mental decline in yourself?<br><br>
Yes, genetics are important in Alzheimer's, but so is a buildup of toxic metals, especially mercury and aluminum.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>A&A</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14754428"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/hug2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Hug2"><br><br>
What a tough situation. How old are you? How old were your parents when diagnosed? Are you seeing any mental decline in yourself?<br><br>
Yes, genetics are important in Alzheimer's, but so is a buildup of toxic metals, especially mercury and aluminum.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I am 44. My memory is so so. But I am under alot of stress with my chaotic life. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> So who knows if its normal or not. I think thats why I want to see someone.<br><br>
I am not sure exactly when my Dad was diagnosed. I would say he was in his early to mid 70's. I clearly remember back in 1994 he seemed confused to me. They had come out to visit us when we were living in Kansas. In hindsight I would say he had it then.<br><br>
My Mom was probably in her mid to late 70's. But with my Mom its hard to tell because in the early 90's she had a sub-dural hematoma and had to have emergency brain surgery. That effected her memory to an extent.<br><br>
I am not sure how old my Mom's sisters where when they were diagnosed or started showing signs. My one Aunt I clearly remember it was at my Grandma's funeral. She seemed really odd. In fact my Mom asked me if I noticed anything. I said yes. I think she has Alzheimer's. She said yes. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> This particular Aunt died two days after my Dad did. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
You know the weird thing is. None of my Mom's brothers have Alzheimer's or as far as I know are showing symptoms. One younger is alive and not showing signs of it either.<br><br>
So I am wanting to look at brain health. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sbgrace</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14753299"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'd see someone. They do have some drugs to slow/delay progression now should you begin progression. I've seen some new promising treatments/clinical trials in the news in the last year. You may not be old enough to participate in any trials but if you begin to show mild stuff maybe you could do the other drugs and that would hold you stable as they made progress and then you participate in one of the promising trials. I'd want someone following me so I knew when I was showing signs and needed to take action. And it seems like the guy who sees it all the time could do that for you.<br><br>
My son has a horrible disease that's progressive (mitochondrial disorder). But I have solid reason to hope there will be an effective treatment in his life. I think the same for you. I really do...not just pie in the sky but because of the progress in neurodegenerative areas that's being made now.<br><br>
There is overlap in my son's condition and Alzheimers (and most neurodegenerative things really). I admit I'm not up on the current research in that area but look into coq10 and see where they are with that in the research. I doubt it would be treatment based on how it works with mito and parkinsons and the like but more preventing declines. I believe the promising treatment (there isn't one now, just slowing progression and trying to protect) for my son's condition is also related to coq10 in some way but it's all secretive now.<br><br>
My son's geneticist uses epic4health brands only <a href="http://www.epic4health.com/" target="_blank">http://www.epic4health.com/</a> (Tischon corp makes them and this is what is used in clinical trials and has far superior effects in the body). Using only that form is typical for those treating mitochondrial and related disorders. You don't use over the counter at the drugstore stuff. See where the research is with coq10 and Alzheimer's. If the research is still supporting it start it now (the Tischon forms...I can tell you what I take myself).<br>
Here is an example of the link between mitochondrial function and Alzheimer's and potential of coq10. <a href="http://www.springerlink.com/content/q73h34w477970236/" target="_blank">http://www.springerlink.com/content/q73h34w477970236/</a><br><br>
Another: <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17192765" target="_blank">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17192765</a><br>
Parkinson's has proven response in my understanding (as does mito).<br><a href="http://iospress.metapress.com/content/rk504221826mkg70/" target="_blank">http://iospress.metapress.com/content/rk504221826mkg70/</a><br>
AD=Alzheimer's Disease and CoQ=oral coq10 adiminstration<br><br><br><br>
edited to add: I found this <a href="http://www.epic4health.com/lcarandotcon.html" target="_blank">http://www.epic4health.com/lcarandotcon.html</a> Andrew takes carintine as well for his stuff. You could easily do that if research is supporting it.<br><br>
Dosing recommendations for mito are:<br>
CoQ10 5 – 15 mg/kg/day (Tischon forms)<br><br>
Levo-carnitine<br>
(Carnitor) Variable, starting dose of 30 mg/kg/day, typical maximum of 100 mg/kg/day<br><br>
Acetyl-L-Carnitine 250 – 1000 mg per day (I think acetyl is mentioned above/it's probably better absorbed and maybe more effective in the brain but more expensive and not prescription).<br><br>
I'm saying there is hope.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/hug2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Hug2"></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I will come back and read your links. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,192 Posts
Honestly? I don't think seeing a neurologist would be that helpful. Doctors are trained to treat disease already occurring and really there's no guarantee that you'll get Alzheimers. I'd research it and maybe see a ND. I found tons of link with a quick search.<br><br><a href="http://www.alzheimersprevention.org/" target="_blank">http://www.alzheimersprevention.org/</a><br><br><a href="http://helpguide.org/elder/alzheimers_prevention_slowing_down_treatment.htm" target="_blank">http://helpguide.org/elder/alzheimer..._treatment.htm</a>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Latte Mama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14754502"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Honestly? I don't think seeing a neurologist would be that helpful. Doctors are trained to treat disease already occurring and really there's no guarantee that you'll get Alzheimers. I'd research it and maybe see a ND. I found tons of link with a quick search.<br><br><a href="http://www.alzheimersprevention.org/" target="_blank">http://www.alzheimersprevention.org/</a><br><br><a href="http://helpguide.org/elder/alzheimers_prevention_slowing_down_treatment.htm" target="_blank">http://helpguide.org/elder/alzheimer..._treatment.htm</a></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Thank you. I was just able to skim thru it right now. But I see alot of stuf that would be helpful. I will read tomorrow after my son goes to school.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
A dear friend of mine has the family history to make Alzheimer's a strong possibility. His family experience prompted him to start the second (or, is it first?) largest Alzheimer's support and research group in the US. I've come to hear a lot about what's out there, in terms of research, testing and prevention. Offhand, this is what I recall him speaking about most recently -<br><br>
Alzheimer's that runs in families seems to have a pattern of genetic markers. Testing is available, though I don't think it's value is 100% in saying "yeh" or "nay", and you'd have to undergo a psych evaluation to even be considered for it - to make sure the knowledge would be of benefit to you. My friend has been tested.<br><br>
He's also part of a study where his memory is tested on a yearly basis to see if it is in keeping with normal or skewing toward a problem.<br><br>
The biggest problem with both the genetic testing and the memory testing is - "What would you do with the knowledge if it showed you were having problems?" There is no cure and little understanding of what might help to prevent or slow progression.<br><br>
He's incorporated certain things in his life in an attempt to prevent. He takes Lipitor (a cholesterol lowering drug) because there's some evidence of benefit. He also takes a baby aspirin every day, along with highly refined fish oil. He eats a diet low in simple carbohydrates and keeps his weight toward the lower end of normal. He keeps very active, physically - gym, skiing, walking instead of driving. He also exercises his mind with puzzles and books on technical topics, coursework and conversation with intereting people.<br><br>
Whether any of what he is doing makes (or will make) a difference, I don't know. I only know that he has access to those involved in current research and the best knowledge that's out there now.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top