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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 3 year old with verbal apraxia. Just started ST last week and am wondering how others with this dx have done?<br><br>
Also, anyone know of good reading on the subject? I will follow up on this with his SLP too.
 

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Try this website:<br><a href="http://www.apraxia-kids.org/" target="_blank">http://www.apraxia-kids.org/</a><br><br>
I am an SLP, have seen lots of kids with apraxia,a nd with regular home practice, I've seen excellent results. At 3, you're starting at the right time!
 

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My ds' previous ST didn't "officially" diagnose him with it because at the time he had very little language skills and I guess to diagnose it they have to have "some", but she did say that's what she really thought was going on. But unfortunately we moved away and have since been unable to get such a diagnosis. ST services here are just not that great and I have yet to find a good private ST to take him to - well, that is open for new students. The ST through the school won't diagnose or even entertain the idea, I guess because it would warrant extra therapy time. It's pretty sad.<br><br>
I will be watching this thread, it will kick me in the butt some more to stay on top of this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks chann96 for the link - am running out this morning so I will check it out in-depth later today. Our St hasn't officially diagnosed him either but likewise says that what she believes is going on for him. He was evaluated at 2.5 and was borderline eligible for services - speech delay but all else tested average or above, so we didn't pursue services (I didn't like the ST! I am an OT so I checked with all the ST's I knew and they said we could try to encourage speech at home and see how it goes), but now I wish I had. He only has about 25-30 words, some better articulated then others, but lots of signing that we started when he was less then a year (thank God!!) so he does communictae well with us - just not so well with others, especially other children. Fortunately he is VERY sociable - will run after kids shouting "HI, Hi, HI!!!" in any effort to get them to play with him.<br><br>
Any at-home ideas or reading list would be really appreciated! I should have mentioned that most of the ST's that I know work with the adult population and in geriatrics, as do I, so their suggestions about the above are limited.<br><br>
Thank you so much everyone - you lit up my day to hear that lots of apraxic kids do well!!
 

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that apraxia link is a good one.<br><br>
my oldest has severe apraxia - both oral and muscle.<br><br>
we are a bilingual household - ASL/English and that's what's working for us.<br><br>
We've noticed his ASL proficiency explodes before he comes out with a verbal word. The ASL helps him significantly, as he can still get his wants/needs/desires/thoughts across clearly and age appropriate. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Everything I read said if you go with a sign language to make sure EVERYONE is on board with it - INCLUDING the speech therapist. We really lucked out. We got a fresh from college gal who is very openminded and recognizes the importance of ASL and has been brushing up on common words/phrases and is very willing to ask me for translations when she sees a sign/combo of signs that David does that she's unfamiliar with.<br><br>
Same with my youngest son who's severely Deaf.<br><br>
BettyAnn<br><br>
ps my david has been in speech therapy since he was 2 years old. he was on waiting list from 9 months of age on, though.<br><br>
ooh, things that are EASY to do in home use that help with apraxia - is stuff like musical instruments - the flutaphone/whistle, that kind of thing - different shaped mouth pieces. Also blowing bubbles - use a variety of wand sizes. Those all help strengthen the mouth muscles. We were doing all those things before we got speech therapy cause i'm one of 'those' moms who if my child expresses interest in something, I encourage it big time. *grin*
 

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and after a year and 3 mos of therapy he approximates much better. No more crying and head banging all the time. He still can't talk. He can't move his tongue from side to side.<br><br>
We use PECS and a Go Talk 4+ Augmentative Communication Device. We don't sign much because he was also born with hand birth defects and he has very short digits and only 2 thumbs and 4 fingers.<br><br>
At home I do oral motor stretches and we play with flashcards and read books.<br><br>
Sincerely,<br>
Debra, homeschooling mom of 4 ages 10 (AS), 9, 7, and 4 (HFA, apraxia, dysarthria)
 

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<div style="font-style:italic;">My ds' previous ST didn't "officially" diagnose him with it because at the time he had very little language skills and I guess to diagnose it they have to have "some", but she did say that's what she really thought was going on. But unfortunately we moved away and have since been unable to get such a diagnosis. ST services here are just not that great and I have yet to find a good private ST to take him to - well, that is open for new students. The ST through the school won't diagnose or even entertain the idea, I guess because it would warrant extra therapy time. It's pretty sad.</div>
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Hey cool my multi-quote thing actually worked!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> I'm easily impressed with myself.<br><br>
Sparklemama - it is very possible to diagnose a child with very few language skills. My daughter was diagnosed at 2.5 years. She had 3 words (2 sounds) and was almost completely non-verbal. Based on watching her limited attempts to talk and other things we were able to tell the therpist she was diagnosed immediately. I will say I think that takes a therapist with a lot of experience with apraxia, but her therapist's office actually really diagnosed her over the phone based on what I was telling them (I had already really diagnosed her myself from the internet after her other SLP wasn't doing it.) Her current-SLP then of course saw her in person to confirm the diagnosis and evaluate her more thoroughly.<br><br>
Unfortunately, I have read that many families encounter the problem of not having an SLP willing or able to make the diagnosis in a public school or EI setting. I honestly believe many of them don't have the experience and training of working with kids with apraxia to really recognize it and know how to work with it. I know that is not always a popular opinion around here, but it seems to happen too often. I think you're right also that the schools just don't have the time to devote at least 1 hour of one-on-one therapy time a week to a child. The SLPs in schools have lots of kids to take care of and a limited time to do it. You might try going to the apraxia kids site noted above and ask on their message board if anyone is familiar with a good SLP in your area. There is also a yahoo message board that is a good resource for that type of question. <a href="http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/childrensapraxianet/" target="_blank">http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group...ensapraxianet/</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>OTmama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7946364"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Thanks chann96 for the link - am running out this morning so I will check it out in-depth later today.<br><br>
Any at-home ideas or reading list would be really appreciated!</div>
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Thanks OTmama, but I can't take the credit for the link - that was dutchgal. I second that link though. It's very helpful. Also checkout the yahoo group I mentioned above. I don't have any other reading list that's really helpful except maybe "The Out of Sync Child" because a lot of kids with apraxia seem to also have some level of sensory issues. Approaching my daughter's sensory issues has been helpful for her therapy and her therapist's office actually has a small gym in it for just that purpose. They work to get the child's whole body organized to help their brain be more organized for speech. It has been astonishing to me to see the difference in my daughter's speech and attentiveness just from a few minutes of swinging or playing in a ball pit.<br><br>
Another suggestion I always give with apraxia is to read up on omega 3-6-9 supplements. The yahoo group I gave is an excellent source of info on that. It's a personal decision of course, but a lot of parents of kids with apraxia have seen amazing results with it.
 

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I also have a 3 yr old with moderate apraxia and a phonological disorder. She has been seeing the ST for just about three months and we have made some improvement but not as much as we were hoping. She "talks" alot but only myself , her twin sister and my other two kids can understand her and thats only about 50 % of the time and usually involves gesturing or visual clues.<br><br>
She has had two hearing tests. The fist we took her to a private clinic and he hooked her up with earphones and went into the other room and spoke to her and watched her through a two way mirror. She completly ignored him and he was not able to get anytype of diagnosis. He suggested we take her to the local "free" hearing clinic as they have a different test they could use that wouldn't need her cooperation our ST was able to get us in quickly but they did the same test again. This time they had a woman sit with her and when dd hear the noise over the earphones she was supposted to put the block into the bucket. I think she heard the lower registers but at one point she was sitting there holding the little block next to her heart and waiting. The woman said "put the block in the bucket when you hear the sound" dd said "I waiting for the sound" (which I translated and repeated to the woman) then the woman just started saying "you hear it put it in" and giving her what i felt were non-verbal cues to put the blocks in. Well she passed the test <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">: but I don't really feel she did. and they wouldn't give her the test we wanted.<br><br>
I conplained to my DR. so now we are waiting for an appointment at the local children's hospital. I have three independant DR's and ST who are pretty sure she has a hearing problem we just need to figure out what it is.<br><br>
I also proved it to my family by walking up to dd when she was playing and blowing a whistle loudly behind her. She didn't even look up or flinch. She also talks in a high pitched very loud voice.<br><br>
I would just like a diagnosis so we can move on and deal with her issues the best way possible. Its all very frustrating.<br><br>
Sarah
 

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Besides oral motor stuff (using a Nuk brush, whistles, blowing bubbles, sucking liquids through straws - crazy straws especially), I would definitely look into the omega 3 6 9 supplements. A lot of people have had a lot of success with them. I think Nordic Natural's or Omega Brite are the ones most often recommended.<br><br>
I would definitely pursue ASL. The Signing Time dvds were excellent for us. It really allowed Anna to keep her language development at an age appropriate level while working on the oral motor and articulation issues.<br><br>
I would look for a therapist trained in either the Kaufman approach (cards that teach approximations for words, with each simple word's approximation getting more complex as the child articulates better) and/ or the prompt technique. (I think it uses hand signals to teach a kid how to form sounds.) Kids with apraxia need pretty intense therapy, usually three times a week. At least.<br><br>
I would read The Late Talker. It has a lot of good advice in it.<br><br>
I would also look into getting pediatric OT. I know a lot of kids with apraxia really benefit from it, especially work with motor planning. Many kids go directly from OT to ST. The OT and sensory work really help prime the learnign pump to help them use their oral muscles better.
 

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Good morning. My 13 year old son has apraxia, sensory integration dysfunction, auditory processing disorder, and ??? When he was young, he was nonverbal. We used sign language with him to allow him to communicate, and to decrease his frustration. He began intensive speech therapy when he was 3. I made certain that I found him a speech therapist that was well-versed and experienced in pediatric apraxia. As he began talking more, he dropped the sign language. He attended speech therapy 2-3 times per week until about age 11.5. I could tell that he was just burned out then, and needed a break so we discontinued speech therapy. We had 4 separate therapists during that time . . . all were expert in pediatric apraxia.<br><br>
There are still things that we work on at home with him, and when he's becoming ill or really stressed, speech declines somewhat. But on the whole, he is able to communicate very well. As he's become older, he also realizes that if someone doesn't understand what he's said one way, he'll persist and try to say it another way. People that know him understand most of what he is attempting to say. People that don't know him understand him about 90% or more of the time.<br><br>
It's a very difficult thing to deal with, but with the right help, your child can make a great deal of progress.<br><br>
Good luck!<br><br>
Linda
 

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Here's some more links:<br><br><a href="http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/childrensapraxianet/" target="_blank">http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group...ensapraxianet/</a><br><a href="http://www.debtsmart.net/talk/index.html" target="_blank">http://www.debtsmart.net/talk/index.html</a><br><a href="http://www.speechville.com/helping-at-home/helping-at-home.html" target="_blank">http://www.speechville.com/helping-a...g-at-home.html</a><br><a href="https://www.kintera.org/site/c.chKMI0PIIsE/b.493023/k.832B/Apraxia_Message_Board_All/apps/mb/discussion.asp?kntaw6601=089D133EA1324B1382C5E3B0BB095793" target="_blank">https://www.kintera.org/site/c.chKMI...C5E3B0BB095793</a>
 
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