Mothering Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In addition to my breadmachine (see my other post)--I also bought a Salton 1quart yogurt maker. I'm so excited


I've never used one before, so I thouhty I'd ask for hints, tips, and advice from the pros.

Most recipes call for powdered/dry milk--what brand and type is best? Is there something organic/no-hormones or antibiotics out there?

Is there an advantage to either using a powdered starter or some organic yogurt from the store? Seems like "starter powder" costs more than using yogurt as your starter. Favorite brands?

I am used to eating Yoplait yogurt (I know, so sweet and bad for me
). I'm not sure how I'm going to get used to eating good-for-me-yogurt. What types of flavoring and sweeteners should I try? I don't think I an bear to just eat plain yogurt starting out.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,805 Posts
I had a yoghurt maker, but that was many years ago... I now do mine in a Mason jar in the oven...Anyways...

The powdered milk addition is to make the yoghurt thicker and to add more "milky" flavour in it. If you're used to commercial yoghurt, then you'll be wanting to add some in. I can't recommend any though, since I didn't/don't use it.

The yoghurt I make (without the powder) is fairly thin compared to Yoplait, and not sweetened. If I wanted it sweetened, I'd used a tablespoon of jam (for fruit flavour) or a teaspoon of honey, and mix it in. You could also put in a few drops of vanilla if you like.

As for starters, you can just buy a small container (about a cup or so) of regular store organic yoghurt (or non organic, whichever you prefer) and use that. You don't really need any special "starters". I also use leftover homemade yoghurt as my starter for the next batch. Just have to make sure I don't eat it all though!

I find that my yoghurt turns out differently each time. This may be due to oven temperature differences or the amount of starter yoghurt I add, and how long it incubates for. I would think that with a yoghurt maker, things would be more regulated and you'd be more consistant. It does take a few batches to figure out what ingredient ratios are good.

An added bonus is that you'd always have yoghurt on hand for baking and cooking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
807 Posts
I make my yogurt completely from powdered milk unless I have milk going bad. I do it to rotate through my food storage and also because it's cheap. I just buy it at the grocery store. I am sure there is organic, but I haven't looked for it online yet. (Zero resources in my area.)

Anyways, I just heat 1 quart (mixed per the package with an extra bit of powdered milk added) up to almost boiling, then cool it down to 110 Fahrenheit and add the starter. Then I leave it in the yogurt maker overnight. I get the same results every time.

For flavoring, I usually just add a cut up peach or other fresh fruit. I also like it with fruit preserves. Even if you have to add a little sugar, it's still way better for you than the yoplait.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,499 Posts
another one her who makes yogurt in jars.

i just chop up fresh fruit to flavor mine.

My 3 year old loves my tropical fruit yogurt. I just chop into tiny pieces: kiwi, papaya, pineapple and mango. I usually let the fruit sit out for a while (5 hours?) after I've cut it up because it gets kind of juicy, then I add it to the yogurt.

As for the dry milk powder, it will just make the yogurt thicker. I let my yogurt incubate for 24 hours so mine gets really thick anyways. I found that when I only let it incubate for 6 hours or whatever, it was very thin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks!
Can't wait to try it out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,053 Posts
Milk powder is very bad ... oxidized fats and proteins create free radicals.

If you need a thicker yogurt, drip it afterwards or add gelatin.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top